N. Jonathan Peress, Author at Conservation Law Foundation

N. Jonathan Peress

Blog
A Major Milestone for a Coal-Free Massachusetts
by N. Jonathan Peress

This past week marked a major milestone in CLF’s Coal-Free Massachusetts campaign. Not only did Salem Harbor burn coal for the last time, but on Monday, the owners of Massachusetts’ last remaining coal-fired power plant, Mt. Tom Station in Holyoke, threw in the towel and announced the plant’s retirement effective October of this year. These…

Blog
Salem Gas Plant Settlement: True Success Will Lie in Setting Required Emission Limits for Future Projects
by N. Jonathan Peress

By unanimous vote, the Massachusetts Energy Facilities Siting Board has adopted a groundbreaking settlement agreement between Footprint Power and CLF regarding the New Jersey–based developer’s proposed natural-gas-fired power plant in Salem. That agreement requires an approximately 80% reduction in allowable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the proposed natural gas-fired power plant by 2050, and the…

Blog
Transforming New England’s Energy System
by N. Jonathan Peress

There has been big news in the New England energy landscape in the past few months. Two of the largest power plants in the region – both of which have been on the wrong side of CLF advocacy for years, Vermont Yankee in Vermont and Brayton Point in Massachusetts – are being retired by their owners.…

Blog
Brayton Point Retirement Means Game Over for Coal in New England
by N. Jonathan Peress

Last week, Conservation Law Foundation and its allies cheered the news that New England’s largest coal plant, Brayton Point Station in Somerset, Massachusetts, will shut down by 2017. Brayton Point has loomed over Somerset and neighboring environmental justice communities on the South Shore for nearly 50 years, belching pollution into the air and destroying wildlife…

Blog
Now Is Not the Time to Delay Renewable Energy Deployment in New Hampshire
by N. Jonathan Peress

The New Hampshire legislature is being asked to impose a moratorium on wind power projects in the Granite State. In written testimony, CLF and other environmental groups, like the Nature Conservancy, are urging the legislature to reject this proposal. Our position is simple and clear – the wind siting process in New Hampshire may not be perfect…

Blog
PSNH: Bad Planning and Old Power Plants Taking Their Toll on New Hampshire
by N. Jonathan Peress

As the nation continues to move beyond coal as a fuel for electricity generation, PSNH continues to cling to its obsolete, uneconomic coal plants that need massive subsidies from ratepayers to operate. Conservation Law Foundation recently filed a brief with the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission that blows the whistle on PSNH’s failure to meet…

Blog
Ratepayers Subsidizing PSNH’s Addiction to Coal
by N. Jonathan Peress

The nation and New Hampshire are relying less and less on coal — our dirtiest, least efficient fuel — to meet our electric power needs. PSNH recently announced it is not operating its flagship coal plant, Merrimack Station in Bow; the plant will sit completely idle for six months of 2012. The two coal boilers at PSNH’s Schiller Station in Portsmouth will operate even less. Yet, PSNH customers continue to pay a premium to keep PSNH’s coal plants on life support, thanks to a regulatory system that protects PSNH’s interests over those of ratepayers.

Blog
Salem Harbor Enforced Shutdown: The Beginning of the End for Old Coal in New England
by N. Jonathan Peress

This week the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) and HealthLink secured an Order from the US District Court in Massachusetts requiring Salem Harbor power plant owner Dominion to shut down all four units at the 60-year-old coal-fired power plant by 2014. In bringing a clear end to the prolonged decline of Salem Harbor Station, this settlement ushers in a new era of clean air, clean water and clean energy for the community of Salem, MA, and for New England as a whole.

Blog
Massachusetts and Federal Government Team Up to Tap Abundant Offshore Wind Energy Resource
by N. Jonathan Peress

Earlier today my colleague Sue Reid, VP & Director of CLF Massachusetts, joined state and federal officials to announce the latest milestone for obtaining plentiful and clean renewable wind energy from the Outer Continental Shelf offshore of Massachusetts. Specifically, they initiated the process for developers to begin leasing and site assessment, and for data gathering and public input, to facilitate off shore wind deployment in an area approximately 12 nautical miles south of Martha’s Vineyard and 13 nautical miles southwest of Nantucket. The “Call Area” as it is termed, was identified following consultation with ocean users, such as fishermen and other stakeholders, through an intergovernmental renewable energy task force led by Massachusetts officials.