Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper

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Rochester and Dover Jeopardize the Great Bay’s Recovery
by Peter Wellenberger

In a move that will further delay progress cleaning up the Great Bay estuary, the Cities of Rochester and Dover, NH, have appealed a critical permit recently issued by the EPA to address the mounting problem of nitrogen pollution in the Great Bay estuary. Whose permit did they appeal? Incredibly, Rochester and Dover are expending…

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Where Have All the Fish Gone?
by Peter Wellenberger

As I travel around the Seacoast, it is such a pleasure to talk with people who share my love for Great Bay.  Recently, I made a presentation to the Durham Garden Club – a group that recognizes the importance of clean water – and ran into an old friend who cares deeply about the health…

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New Hampshire’s Political Winds Help New Hampshire’s Environment
by Tom Irwin

Two years ago, Republicans dominated New Hampshire’s elections at every level, winning races for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, taking complete control of New Hampshire’s Executive Council, and locking up strong majorities in the state legislature.  On Tuesday, the political pendulum swung back in a way that is likely to end some unfortunate…

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Lawns To Lobsters – Fewer Chemicals, Cleaner Water
by Peter Wellenberger

Stormwater continues to be a major source of pollution to the Great Bay estuary. When it rains, runoff carries a wide range of pollutants – from dog waste and lawn fertilizers, to gasoline and oil, to heavy metals, nutrients and sediments – that flow into our waters with little or no treatment. To combat this…

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40 Years Later, Would We Pass the Clean Water Act Today?
by Chris Kilian

I love rivers.  In fact, I love all things water. And so today I’m celebrating the 40th birthday of the Clean Water Act, perhaps America’s most effective and far-reaching environmental law. I grew up on a farm in upstate New York and spent a lot of time stomping around in our ponds, streams, and wetlands…

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A Campaign of Delay – Jeopardizing the Health of Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Officials from Portsmouth, Dover and Rochester – in their continuing campaign to delay critically important pollution reductions in the Great Bay estuary – have put the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on notice that they intend to file suit over the nitrogen discharge levels being proposed in their wastewater treatment permits. As part of this campaign…

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Pavement Sealcoats – Make the Right Choice
by Peter Wellenberger

As I drive around the Seacoast, I see a lot of people getting their driveways resealed. Perhaps people are anxious to get this done before the onset of winter. I wonder, though, if homeowners realize there are different types of sealcoats and that choosing the right one can help protect the environment and our health.…

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Bellamy River – A Hidden Gem In the Great Bay Estuary
by Peter Wellenberger

There are seven rivers that drain into the Great Bay estuary, carrying freshwater runoff – as well as pollutants – from 52 communities including 10 in Maine. The Bellamy River, which flows into Little Bay, originates from Swains Lake in Barrington and flows east through the Bellamy Reservoir in Madbury and then through the City…

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Green Slime or Clean Water: What’s the Future of Great Bay?
by Peter Wellenberger

A week ago I had the pleasure of attending an event to celebrate the restoration of a tidal river. The Winnicut River – primarily located in Greenland, NH – is now the only dam-free river in the Great Bay estuary. Thanks to the hard work of the Winnicut River Watershed Coalition and numerous state and federal agencies, the project includes a new fish passage and, in addition to the dam removal, a restored shoreline.

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Lawn Tips for a Healthy Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

We didn’t always have a love affair with our lawns. Until the late 18th century, most rural homeowners had a patch of packed dirt outside the front door or a small garden that contained a mix of flowers, herbs and vegetables. Up until then, lawns were not practical and were seen strictly as a luxury…