Cape Cod’s Bays Reach Clean Water Milestone, But the Real Work has Just Begun


This week, EPA approved an update to the Areawide Waste Management Plan for Cape Cod, in an effort to address the nutrient pollution crisis that is killing the bays of the Cape. This approval marks a watershed moment in CLF’s advocacy on behalf of clean water on Cape Cod, but there is much work left to be done.

Sunset over Cape Cod Bay at Duck Harbor Beach, Wellfleet, Massachusetts. Cape Cod. ©EcoPhotography

Cape Cod’s waters could soon be on the mend, thanks to CLF’s relentless advocacy. But the real work to clean up the Cape’s ailing bays is just beginning. ©EcoPhotography

CLF will be keeping a watchful eye on the first year of plan implementation, and hopes that the years of work behind this plan update do not go to waste. CLF remains concerned that the plan update relies too heavily on action at the town level, when the towns have failed on the whole to take action over the past thirty years as nutrient pollution degraded the bays.

As the effects of climate change become stronger and without adequate remedial action, the Cape’s nutrient pollution problems will only worsen.  The future of the Cape’s economy and the delicate ecosystems that it is built upon depend on the serious effort and actions of the towns and the Cape Cod Commission.

Focus Areas

Clean WaterOceans

Places

Massachusetts

One Response to “Cape Cod’s Bays Reach Clean Water Milestone, But the Real Work has Just Begun”

Leave a Reply

About the CLF Blog

The views and opinions expressed on this blog do not necessarily represent the opinions or positions of Conservation Law Foundation, our boards, or our supporters.