CLF Ventures Releases Land-based Wind Energy Guide

Walker Larsen

In partnership with the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC), CLF Ventures recently released Land-based Wind Energy: A Guide to Understanding the Issues and Making Informed Decisions. (PDF, 1.6MB)

Wind energy has the potential to play a significant and beneficial role in an energy economy that seeks to rely less heavily on fossil-fuel based electricity production. For this reason, many communities are currently trying to learn more about wind energy development and determine whether it makes sense in their city or town.  Land-based Wind Energy provides municipal officials and other local decision-makers with clear overviews of wind energy siting issues as well as best practices for community engagement.

Specifically, the guide includes:

  • Guidelines for how to assess the quality of available information and how to resolve conflicting points;
  • Overviews, contextual information, and recommended reading on important topics like wind turbine sound, shadow flicker, health, property values, and energy project economics; and
  • Recommendations on how to structure a robust local review process when siting wind energy projects. By this we mean a process with full participation by relevant stakeholders, transparent decision-making, and durable outcomes with public support.

Download the guide, and learn more about CLF Ventures.

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14 Responses to “CLF Ventures Releases Land-based Wind Energy Guide”

  1. I can’t believe CLF totally ignored the biggest threat to biodiversity – loss and fragmentation of habitat. The biggest problem with badly sited industrial wind is that it is fragmenting previously unfragmented habitat. Many, many conservation organizations are working against a closing window of opportunity to save what is left of our large unfragmented forest blocks. Right now, one of the biggest threats to being able to do that is industrial wind. Wind should be sited where there is existing fragmentation, existing infrastructure, and existing distribution lines. That CLF never mentions fragmentation as major threat to biodiversity in this document is very depressing.

    • Walker Larsen

      We agree that habitat loss and fragmentation are critical issues to consider when evaluating wind energy development projects. This guide is not intended to be an exhaustive list of potential issues, but is rather an overview of some of the issues being voiced by communities as they consider wind projects. This is in fact why the guide puts so much emphasis on the community process and stakeholder engagement: one group will not be able to identify and consider every aspect of a project. Wind energy development should be open and inclusive in order to ensure that multiple and different points of view, and respective priorities and concerns, will be aired and considered.

  2. I can’t believe CLF totally ignored the biggest threat to biodiversity – loss and fragmentation of habitat. The biggest problem with badly sited industrial wind is that it is fragmenting previously unfragmented habitat. Many, many conservation organizations are working against a closing window of opportunity to save what is left of our large unfragmented forest blocks. Right now, one of the biggest threats to being able to do that is industrial wind. Wind should be sited where there is existing fragmentation, existing infrastructure, and existing distribution lines. That CLF never mentions fragmentation as major threat to biodiversity in this document is very depressing.

    • Walker Larsen

      We agree that habitat loss and fragmentation are critical issues to consider when evaluating wind energy development projects. This guide is not intended to be an exhaustive list of potential issues, but is rather an overview of some of the issues being voiced by communities as they consider wind projects. This is in fact why the guide puts so much emphasis on the community process and stakeholder engagement: one group will not be able to identify and consider every aspect of a project. Wind energy development should be open and inclusive in order to ensure that multiple and different points of view, and respective priorities and concerns, will be aired and considered.

  3. I can’t believe CLF totally ignored the biggest threat to biodiversity – loss and fragmentation of habitat. The biggest problem with badly sited industrial wind is that it is fragmenting previously unfragmented habitat. Many, many conservation organizations are working against a closing window of opportunity to save what is left of our large unfragmented forest blocks. Right now, one of the biggest threats to being able to do that is industrial wind. Wind should be sited where there is existing fragmentation, existing infrastructure, and existing distribution lines. That CLF never mentions fragmentation as major threat to biodiversity in this document is very depressing.

    • Walker Larsen

      We agree that habitat loss and fragmentation are critical issues to consider when evaluating wind energy development projects. This guide is not intended to be an exhaustive list of potential issues, but is rather an overview of some of the issues being voiced by communities as they consider wind projects. This is in fact why the guide puts so much emphasis on the community process and stakeholder engagement: one group will not be able to identify and consider every aspect of a project. Wind energy development should be open and inclusive in order to ensure that multiple and different points of view, and respective priorities and concerns, will be aired and considered.

  4. I can’t believe CLF totally ignored the biggest threat to biodiversity – loss and fragmentation of habitat. The biggest problem with badly sited industrial wind is that it is fragmenting previously unfragmented habitat. Many, many conservation organizations are working against a closing window of opportunity to save what is left of our large unfragmented forest blocks. Right now, one of the biggest threats to being able to do that is industrial wind. Wind should be sited where there is existing fragmentation, existing infrastructure, and existing distribution lines. That CLF never mentions fragmentation as major threat to biodiversity in this document is very depressing.

    • Walker Larsen

      We agree that habitat loss and fragmentation are critical issues to consider when evaluating wind energy development projects. This guide is not intended to be an exhaustive list of potential issues, but is rather an overview of some of the issues being voiced by communities as they consider wind projects. This is in fact why the guide puts so much emphasis on the community process and stakeholder engagement: one group will not be able to identify and consider every aspect of a project. Wind energy development should be open and inclusive in order to ensure that multiple and different points of view, and respective priorities and concerns, will be aired and considered.

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