End of Nuclear in Vermont

Sandy Levine | @CLFLevine

photo courtesy of David Jones @ flickr.com

photo courtesy of David Jones @ flickr.com

The end of a nuclear power era arrived in Vermont on December 29, 2014.

The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power plant in southern Vermont stopped producing power.

This is indeed the end of an era. And the beginning of a new one.

The shuttering of Vermont Yankee marks a significant passage – for CLF, for Vermont, and for New England. Our energy supply is undergoing transformation. As we move away from older and polluting coal and nuclear plants, we rely more on cleaner and lower cost supplies paving the way for a brighter energy future.

I’ll admit, with Vermont Yankee’s troubled history, I was not entirely convinced it would actually shut down. Old habits die hard. In the past, Vermont Yankee’s owners went to court rather than comply with promises to close the plant in 2012. The plant had leaks and its owners failed to provide truthful information about the leaks to regulators. The tired, old, polluting plant on the banks of the Connecticut River was forced to operate well past its previously planned retirement.

From the sale of Vermont Yankee in 2002 to the regulatory proceedings and litigation about its continued operation and leaks, CLF has shown that reliance on Vermont Yankee is an expensive and bad bet.

The plant proved to be a bad deal for Vermont. Other power was less expensive and the needed safety repairs required after Fukushima would be costly. Too costly. As renewable power supplies continue to grow, we have the ability to provide power with low or zero fuel costs. The need for these large, expensive older plants declines. It feels a bit like moving away from massive centralized computers in the era of smaller laptops and smart phones.

The lights are still on after Vermont Yankee shut down. And they will stay on. There is no question it will take continued effort to build the clean energy future we know we need. It is within our reach.

Many workers will remain at Vermont Yankee overseeing the safe decommissioning of the plant, which will take decades. They remain part of the transformation that is marked by Vermont Yankee’s closing.

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