Gender Justice, Environmental Justice

Sandy Levine | @CLFLevine

CLF Intern, Taylor L. Curtis with Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin, photo courtesy of Zak Griefen

CLF Intern, Taylor L. Curtis with Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin, photo courtesy of Zak Griefen

CLF is pleased to highlight the great work of our Vermont intern, Taylor L. Curtis, who is the lead and driving force behind a month-long symposium Sex, Gender, Expression and the First Amendment Project (SGE1) held at Vermont Law School from March 20–April 12 – exploring the intersection of free expression, sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender identity.

Inspired by the artwork of Evie Lovett, the program includes panel discussions, a film, an art exhibit and Gayla, a celebration of the historic queer art form of drag. Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin and Vermont Supreme Court Justice Beth Robinson, and transgender rights attorney and activist Jennifer Levi provide lively presentations and support for the event.

“As Evie’s work inspired the creation of this Project,” Taylor L. Curtis said that her “hope is that the events challenge our understanding of sexuality and identity and encourage discussion beyond politics of inclusion. To achieve real social change we need to be careful we are not just asking or fighting to be included in systems and institutions that are fundamentally broken. By dislodging the centrality of equality rhetoric and challenging the demand for inclusion – through free expression – we can reinvigorate the queer political imagination with fantastic possibility!”

These insights resonate in the environment movement. The struggles for sexual and gender justice and environmental justice are similar. By identifying the root causes and most prominent hurdles of social justice movements today we begin to understand how to achieve transformative change that benefits the environment, its people and all justice movements.

Focus Areas

Places

Vermont

Campaigns


About the CLF Blog

The views and opinions expressed on this blog do not necessarily represent the opinions or positions of Conservation Law Foundation, our boards, or our supporters.