Growing Clean Energy

Sandy Levine | @CLFLevine

The recent massive snow storms provide a stark reminder of why we need more clean energy. The more fossil fuels we burn, the more global warming we face.  Fiercer and more frequent storms continue to march across New England wreaking havoc with the daily lives and pocketbooks of so many.

Thankfully there are many efforts to bring more clean energy to the region and begin to break our addiction to fossil fuels.

In Vermont, Legislators are taking up a broad bill that would expand renewable energy opportunities. For electricity, the legislation would set the highest standard of any place in the region – 75% renewable by 2032. While much of that electricity would come from existing sources, including imported hydro power from Canada, it sets a new benchmark for what is possible — closing down coal plants, walking away from new gas facilities, and relying on more clean local power. The City of Burlington is already exceeding this standard and showing in real terms how meeting a 100% renewable standard is achievable and saves money for their customers.

The Vermont legislation would require that a full 10% of the electricity in 2032 come from smaller scale local renewable projects. Putting power generation closer to power needs reduces pollution and curbs the need for massive new transmission projects. This builds on the rapid success in Vermont of expanding customer opportunities to rely on renewable power. When combined with energy efficiency that already meets over 13% of our electric supply needs, Vermont jumps well ahead of the curve in bringing about a much needed clean energy transformation for the region.

The legislation also corrects a troubling problem with existing Vermont law. No longer would utilities double-count renewable resources, by both claiming them for Vermont while selling them to customers in other states. The Federal Trade Commission recently criticized this practice in regards to one utility’s activities. Instead, Vermont’s renewable supply would be better integrated into the regional renewable markets. Vermont can continue to sell renewable power in the region and avoid undermining our own efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Some of the more innovative aspects of the Vermont legislation begin to tackle the biggest sources of greenhouse gasses in Vermont – fossil fuel used for heating and transportation. As of 2011, heating and industrial uses account for about 32% percent of Vermont’s greenhouse gas emissions and transportation accounts for about 46%. To meet our needed greenhouse gas reductions and avoid future climate disasters, we need to reduce fossil fuels from more than just electricity.

To further reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save money, the Vermont legislation would set binding requirements that by 2032 Vermont utilities provide opportunities for their customers to reduce fossil fuel use for heating and transportation. Projects can include such things as expanding the availability of heat pumps, weatherizing homes and businesses, installing efficient biomass heat, and providing facilities to support electric vehicles. Projects would not only need to provide reduced pollution, but offer clear economic savings as well. This opens up opportunities for partnerships that can break down barriers. Meeting customers where they are and providing the services they need and want at a reasonable cost is the hallmark of any good business. Legislation that paves the way for successful businesses to meet our broader 21st century power needs will position Vermont well to tackle global warming. Keeping a clear focus on the economics and the pollution reduction ensures that all Vermonters benefit from these changes.

With storms raging throughout New England, it is good news the Vermont Legislature is taking action to tackle global warming and help Vermonters save money.

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