MA House of Reps Passes Wind Energy Siting Reform Act


On an appropriately wet and windy afternoon yesterday in Boston, the Massachusetts House of Representatives passed the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act with a vote of 101-52. Modeled after the bill passed by the Senate in February, the Act will streamline the siting process for wind energy projects, making it easier for developers and local authorities alike to incorporate well-designed wind power initiatives into the plan to meet the state’s energy demand. The new legislation is a major step towards building a clean energy economy for Massachusetts and reducing dependence on fossil fuels. The bill will now head to a House-Senate conference committee for further discussion.

Here’s what Sue Reid, director of CLF’s Massachusetts Clean Energy and Climate Change Program, had to say on the issue:

“Massachusetts needs to tap into its abundant wind energy resources in order to meet its clean energy goals. We are delighted that the Massachusetts House of Representatives has joined the Senate in passing this wind siting reform bill that is crucial to meeting the state’s energy demand while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and preserving our natural resources. This new legislation will make it easier to develop well-designed wind energy projects. Today’s vote represents a key victory in the state’s ongoing efforts to reduce our dependence on dirty fossil-fuel fired power in Massachusetts.”

Read CLF’s full press statement>>
Learn more about CLF’s renewable energy initiatives in MA and throughout New England>>

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12 Responses to “MA House of Reps Passes Wind Energy Siting Reform Act”

  1. Hampden Mitchell

    Just to let you know that not all conservationists think Industrial Wind Energy is good. There are many citizens in Maine and elsewhere who have spent their own time investigating the Wind industry delving into every aspect of the business who have come to the conclusion that most of the arguments put forward by people who support Industrial Wind do not hold up when put up under the spotlight. This blog reads like a Press release for the Wind Industry so I’m guessing if I was to go into all the evidence showing Industrial Wind to be a bad idea I wouldn’t be able to change your mind but I wanted to show dissent on behalf of the many people who have no financial interests in the wind industry but who believe you are wrong to be promoting Industrial Wind.

  2. Hampden Mitchell

    Just to let you know that not all conservationists think Industrial Wind Energy is good. There are many citizens in Maine and elsewhere who have spent their own time investigating the Wind industry delving into every aspect of the business who have come to the conclusion that most of the arguments put forward by people who support Industrial Wind do not hold up when put up under the spotlight. This blog reads like a Press release for the Wind Industry so I’m guessing if I was to go into all the evidence showing Industrial Wind to be a bad idea I wouldn’t be able to change your mind but I wanted to show dissent on behalf of the many people who have no financial interests in the wind industry but who believe you are wrong to be promoting Industrial Wind.

  3. Hampden Mitchell

    Just to let you know that not all conservationists think Industrial Wind Energy is good. There are many citizens in Maine and elsewhere who have spent their own time investigating the Wind industry delving into every aspect of the business who have come to the conclusion that most of the arguments put forward by people who support Industrial Wind do not hold up when put up under the spotlight. This blog reads like a Press release for the Wind Industry so I’m guessing if I was to go into all the evidence showing Industrial Wind to be a bad idea I wouldn’t be able to change your mind but I wanted to show dissent on behalf of the many people who have no financial interests in the wind industry but who believe you are wrong to be promoting Industrial Wind.

  4. Hampden Mitchell

    Just to let you know that not all conservationists think Industrial Wind Energy is good. There are many citizens in Maine and elsewhere who have spent their own time investigating the Wind industry delving into every aspect of the business who have come to the conclusion that most of the arguments put forward by people who support Industrial Wind do not hold up when put up under the spotlight. This blog reads like a Press release for the Wind Industry so I’m guessing if I was to go into all the evidence showing Industrial Wind to be a bad idea I wouldn’t be able to change your mind but I wanted to show dissent on behalf of the many people who have no financial interests in the wind industry but who believe you are wrong to be promoting Industrial Wind.

  5. The Vestas V 82 commercial wind turbine that is in the 1.65 MW range was sited in Falmouth ,Massachusetts . This turbine was owned by the MTC ,Massachusetts Technology Collaborative in 2005 for a project in Orleans ,Massachusetts . The turbine is making too much noise for the neighbors .

    This turbine was scheduled for Mattapoisett in which on page 14 of the MTC study it states the turbine would be too loud within 800 feet of homes . Yet it was still used in Falmouth near homes !

    http://www.masstech.org/Project%20Deliverables/Comm_Wind/Mattapoisett/Tri-Town_ORR_Preliminary_Site_Analysis.pdf

    Why do we want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? This act I believe was given part of its name, “Reform Act,” to confuse the voters of Massachusetts. This act does the opposite: It takes your town’s zoning away.

    This act sites commercial wind turbines as tall as 40-story buildings in your backyard. An individual resident can’t afford a state Supreme Court appeal under the “Reform Act.”

    The country has evidently arrived at a point in its legal culture where no negative consequences seem to exist for making false or misleading claims to sell wind energy and take your property rights. Should the people who value intellectual honesty be fleeced by such mendacity, even from their government?

    Plymouth’s Sen. Therese Murray, president of the Massachusetts Senate, recently started a re-election bid to continue her work representing parts of Plymouth County and the entire Plymouth and Barnstable District in the Massachusetts Senate.

    Do the voters of the Plymouth and Barnstable Senate District want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? Have the voters of Massachusetts been educated about the negative impacts of this act?

    See page 14

  6. The Vestas V 82 commercial wind turbine that is in the 1.65 MW range was sited in Falmouth ,Massachusetts . This turbine was owned by the MTC ,Massachusetts Technology Collaborative in 2005 for a project in Orleans ,Massachusetts . The turbine is making too much noise for the neighbors .

    This turbine was scheduled for Mattapoisett in which on page 14 of the MTC study it states the turbine would be too loud within 800 feet of homes . Yet it was still used in Falmouth near homes !

    http://www.masstech.org/Project%20Deliverables/Comm_Wind/Mattapoisett/Tri-Town_ORR_Preliminary_Site_Analysis.pdf

    Why do we want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? This act I believe was given part of its name, “Reform Act,” to confuse the voters of Massachusetts. This act does the opposite: It takes your town’s zoning away.

    This act sites commercial wind turbines as tall as 40-story buildings in your backyard. An individual resident can’t afford a state Supreme Court appeal under the “Reform Act.”

    The country has evidently arrived at a point in its legal culture where no negative consequences seem to exist for making false or misleading claims to sell wind energy and take your property rights. Should the people who value intellectual honesty be fleeced by such mendacity, even from their government?

    Plymouth’s Sen. Therese Murray, president of the Massachusetts Senate, recently started a re-election bid to continue her work representing parts of Plymouth County and the entire Plymouth and Barnstable District in the Massachusetts Senate.

    Do the voters of the Plymouth and Barnstable Senate District want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? Have the voters of Massachusetts been educated about the negative impacts of this act?

    See page 14

  7. The Vestas V 82 commercial wind turbine that is in the 1.65 MW range was sited in Falmouth ,Massachusetts . This turbine was owned by the MTC ,Massachusetts Technology Collaborative in 2005 for a project in Orleans ,Massachusetts . The turbine is making too much noise for the neighbors .

    This turbine was scheduled for Mattapoisett in which on page 14 of the MTC study it states the turbine would be too loud within 800 feet of homes . Yet it was still used in Falmouth near homes !

    http://www.masstech.org/Project%20Deliverables/Comm_Wind/Mattapoisett/Tri-Town_ORR_Preliminary_Site_Analysis.pdf

    Why do we want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? This act I believe was given part of its name, “Reform Act,” to confuse the voters of Massachusetts. This act does the opposite: It takes your town’s zoning away.

    This act sites commercial wind turbines as tall as 40-story buildings in your backyard. An individual resident can’t afford a state Supreme Court appeal under the “Reform Act.”

    The country has evidently arrived at a point in its legal culture where no negative consequences seem to exist for making false or misleading claims to sell wind energy and take your property rights. Should the people who value intellectual honesty be fleeced by such mendacity, even from their government?

    Plymouth’s Sen. Therese Murray, president of the Massachusetts Senate, recently started a re-election bid to continue her work representing parts of Plymouth County and the entire Plymouth and Barnstable District in the Massachusetts Senate.

    Do the voters of the Plymouth and Barnstable Senate District want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? Have the voters of Massachusetts been educated about the negative impacts of this act?

    See page 14

  8. The Vestas V 82 commercial wind turbine that is in the 1.65 MW range was sited in Falmouth ,Massachusetts . This turbine was owned by the MTC ,Massachusetts Technology Collaborative in 2005 for a project in Orleans ,Massachusetts . The turbine is making too much noise for the neighbors .

    This turbine was scheduled for Mattapoisett in which on page 14 of the MTC study it states the turbine would be too loud within 800 feet of homes . Yet it was still used in Falmouth near homes !

    http://www.masstech.org/Project%20Deliverables/Comm_Wind/Mattapoisett/Tri-Town_ORR_Preliminary_Site_Analysis.pdf

    Why do we want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? This act I believe was given part of its name, “Reform Act,” to confuse the voters of Massachusetts. This act does the opposite: It takes your town’s zoning away.

    This act sites commercial wind turbines as tall as 40-story buildings in your backyard. An individual resident can’t afford a state Supreme Court appeal under the “Reform Act.”

    The country has evidently arrived at a point in its legal culture where no negative consequences seem to exist for making false or misleading claims to sell wind energy and take your property rights. Should the people who value intellectual honesty be fleeced by such mendacity, even from their government?

    Plymouth’s Sen. Therese Murray, president of the Massachusetts Senate, recently started a re-election bid to continue her work representing parts of Plymouth County and the entire Plymouth and Barnstable District in the Massachusetts Senate.

    Do the voters of the Plymouth and Barnstable Senate District want the Wind Energy Siting Reform Act? Have the voters of Massachusetts been educated about the negative impacts of this act?

    See page 14

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