Making windpower real in New England

Seth Kaplan

CLF is a proud founding member of Renewable Energy New England (RENEW) – a group that brings together renewable energy developers and technology companies with environmental advocates.

In a major milestone in the life of RENEW (a relatively new organization) ISO New England (ISO-NE), the operator of the region’s “bulk” power system and wholesale electricity markets, has elected to perform a regional economic study requested by RENEW.

The RENEW economic study will evaluate how much of the approximately 4,000 megawatts of wind energy projects that have applied to connect to the New England system (the technical phrase is, “in the interconnection queue”) could be developed over the next five years without significant transmission upgrades (that is, building new power lines or supporting hardware) and what the economic impact of making those upgrades would be in order to develop the remaining wind power projects.

ISO-NE performs annual economic studies drawing from requests submitted by stakeholders.  In recent years ISO-NE has undertaken studies at the request of the Governors of the New England states that looked at long-term scenarios for building wind energy resources and transmission for supporting such resources. In the past two years ISO-NE has studied high penetration renewable resource scenarios for the year 2030 in the course of doing a New England Wind Integration Study (NEWIS). RENEW hopes the 2011 study will inform development and transmission upgrade decisions over the next few years as the states work to meet their renewable portfolio standard requirements, address the climate imperative to reduce emissions from the power sector and work to build a new clean economy.

More information on NEWIS and the economy study can be found at the ISO-NE section on the RENEW website.

Special mention and recognition is due to Abigail Krich, the President of Boreas Renewables, transmission consultant to RENEW who was the primary representative of RENEW in the NEWIS process and in the development of the economic study request (and whose material I have shamelessly borrowed from in crafting this blog post).

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8 Responses to “Making windpower real in New England”

  1. Barbara Durkin

    The only way to make wind energy real in Massachusetts is by diminishing private property rights. Thus, the quality of our lives will be diminished.

    Inverse condemnation, or a regulatory taking of private property rights, is exactly what the Patrick Administration has planned. The Wind Turbine Siting Reform Act is a tool provided to developers that allows them to leap-frog past public and environmental protections in place. Why should wind energy LLCs be granted Wind energy mandates that will have direct impacts that reduce property values, and the rights of nearby neighbors?

    Download File(s) that show property loss by wind turbines:
    McCann Appraisal, LLC written testimony re Setbacks & property values June 8 2010.

    http://www.windaction.org/?module=uploads&func=download&fileId=2037

    The intent of the Wind Bill is shift the power of 2/3 Town Meeting vote to an appointed panel that would make all wind turbine siting decisions. This Bill constitutes the erosion of public and environmental protections, setbacks, height restrictions, and zoning now in place to protect citizens residing in Massachusetts communities.

    Boston Business Journal 11/14/10 states: “The Wind Bill will not allow the State to overrule local zoning rules said State energy spokesman Lisa Capone.”

    However, according to the State, the politically appointed wind energy permitting board created by the Wind Bill “…has the authority to waive any local requirements needed to permit the facility, including, e.g., use limits and height limits in local zoning bylaws…”

    The Wind Bill is a bad Bill as it undermines citizens’ rights and local control by design. It’s co-authored by a wind developer seeking unlimited, unmerited, development potential and profits. By the Wind Bill, the public surrenders current zoning and virtually all public and environmental protections in place, including the power of 2/3 Town Meeting Vote, to wind developers and their investors.

    State of Mass Wind Bill Summary:

    http://www.mass.gov/dcr/news/publicmeetings/forestry/wind%20energy%20siting%20act%20summary.pdf

  2. Barbara Durkin

    The only way to make wind energy real in Massachusetts is by diminishing private property rights. Thus, the quality of our lives will be diminished.

    Inverse condemnation, or a regulatory taking of private property rights, is exactly what the Patrick Administration has planned. The Wind Turbine Siting Reform Act is a tool provided to developers that allows them to leap-frog past public and environmental protections in place. Why should wind energy LLCs be granted Wind energy mandates that will have direct impacts that reduce property values, and the rights of nearby neighbors?

    Download File(s) that show property loss by wind turbines:
    McCann Appraisal, LLC written testimony re Setbacks & property values June 8 2010.

    http://www.windaction.org/?module=uploads&func=download&fileId=2037

    The intent of the Wind Bill is shift the power of 2/3 Town Meeting vote to an appointed panel that would make all wind turbine siting decisions. This Bill constitutes the erosion of public and environmental protections, setbacks, height restrictions, and zoning now in place to protect citizens residing in Massachusetts communities.

    Boston Business Journal 11/14/10 states: “The Wind Bill will not allow the State to overrule local zoning rules said State energy spokesman Lisa Capone.”

    However, according to the State, the politically appointed wind energy permitting board created by the Wind Bill “…has the authority to waive any local requirements needed to permit the facility, including, e.g., use limits and height limits in local zoning bylaws…”

    The Wind Bill is a bad Bill as it undermines citizens’ rights and local control by design. It’s co-authored by a wind developer seeking unlimited, unmerited, development potential and profits. By the Wind Bill, the public surrenders current zoning and virtually all public and environmental protections in place, including the power of 2/3 Town Meeting Vote, to wind developers and their investors.

    State of Mass Wind Bill Summary:

    http://www.mass.gov/dcr/news/publicmeetings/forestry/wind%20energy%20siting%20act%20summary.pdf

  3. Barbara Durkin

    The only way to make wind energy real in Massachusetts is by diminishing private property rights. Thus, the quality of our lives will be diminished.

    Inverse condemnation, or a regulatory taking of private property rights, is exactly what the Patrick Administration has planned. The Wind Turbine Siting Reform Act is a tool provided to developers that allows them to leap-frog past public and environmental protections in place. Why should wind energy LLCs be granted Wind energy mandates that will have direct impacts that reduce property values, and the rights of nearby neighbors?

    Download File(s) that show property loss by wind turbines:
    McCann Appraisal, LLC written testimony re Setbacks & property values June 8 2010.

    http://www.windaction.org/?module=uploads&func=download&fileId=2037

    The intent of the Wind Bill is shift the power of 2/3 Town Meeting vote to an appointed panel that would make all wind turbine siting decisions. This Bill constitutes the erosion of public and environmental protections, setbacks, height restrictions, and zoning now in place to protect citizens residing in Massachusetts communities.

    Boston Business Journal 11/14/10 states: “The Wind Bill will not allow the State to overrule local zoning rules said State energy spokesman Lisa Capone.”

    However, according to the State, the politically appointed wind energy permitting board created by the Wind Bill “…has the authority to waive any local requirements needed to permit the facility, including, e.g., use limits and height limits in local zoning bylaws…”

    The Wind Bill is a bad Bill as it undermines citizens’ rights and local control by design. It’s co-authored by a wind developer seeking unlimited, unmerited, development potential and profits. By the Wind Bill, the public surrenders current zoning and virtually all public and environmental protections in place, including the power of 2/3 Town Meeting Vote, to wind developers and their investors.

    State of Mass Wind Bill Summary:

    http://www.mass.gov/dcr/news/publicmeetings/forestry/wind%20energy%20siting%20act%20summary.pdf

  4. Barbara Durkin

    The only way to make wind energy real in Massachusetts is by diminishing private property rights. Thus, the quality of our lives will be diminished.

    Inverse condemnation, or a regulatory taking of private property rights, is exactly what the Patrick Administration has planned. The Wind Turbine Siting Reform Act is a tool provided to developers that allows them to leap-frog past public and environmental protections in place. Why should wind energy LLCs be granted Wind energy mandates that will have direct impacts that reduce property values, and the rights of nearby neighbors?

    Download File(s) that show property loss by wind turbines:
    McCann Appraisal, LLC written testimony re Setbacks & property values June 8 2010.

    http://www.windaction.org/?module=uploads&func=download&fileId=2037

    The intent of the Wind Bill is shift the power of 2/3 Town Meeting vote to an appointed panel that would make all wind turbine siting decisions. This Bill constitutes the erosion of public and environmental protections, setbacks, height restrictions, and zoning now in place to protect citizens residing in Massachusetts communities.

    Boston Business Journal 11/14/10 states: “The Wind Bill will not allow the State to overrule local zoning rules said State energy spokesman Lisa Capone.”

    However, according to the State, the politically appointed wind energy permitting board created by the Wind Bill “…has the authority to waive any local requirements needed to permit the facility, including, e.g., use limits and height limits in local zoning bylaws…”

    The Wind Bill is a bad Bill as it undermines citizens’ rights and local control by design. It’s co-authored by a wind developer seeking unlimited, unmerited, development potential and profits. By the Wind Bill, the public surrenders current zoning and virtually all public and environmental protections in place, including the power of 2/3 Town Meeting Vote, to wind developers and their investors.

    State of Mass Wind Bill Summary:

    http://www.mass.gov/dcr/news/publicmeetings/forestry/wind%20energy%20siting%20act%20summary.pdf

  5. Seth Kaplan

    For those who want an objective compilation of views on the impact of wind turbines on property values take a look at what the National Association of Realtors has compiled on their website. http://www.realtor.org/library/library/fg509

    As to the Massachusetts Wind Facilities Siting Bill – the idea that it would destroy local control is very hard to reconcile with the fact that the final version of the bill approved by the State Senate in the last session was supported by the Massachusetts Municipal Association, the organization that actually represents the towns and cities of the state. http://www.mma.org/public-works-energy-a-utilities/4406-senate-oks-revised-wind-siting-bill

  6. Seth Kaplan

    For those who want an objective compilation of views on the impact of wind turbines on property values take a look at what the National Association of Realtors has compiled on their website. http://www.realtor.org/library/library/fg509

    As to the Massachusetts Wind Facilities Siting Bill – the idea that it would destroy local control is very hard to reconcile with the fact that the final version of the bill approved by the State Senate in the last session was supported by the Massachusetts Municipal Association, the organization that actually represents the towns and cities of the state. http://www.mma.org/public-works-energy-a-utilities/4406-senate-oks-revised-wind-siting-bill

  7. Seth Kaplan

    For those who want an objective compilation of views on the impact of wind turbines on property values take a look at what the National Association of Realtors has compiled on their website. http://www.realtor.org/library/library/fg509

    As to the Massachusetts Wind Facilities Siting Bill – the idea that it would destroy local control is very hard to reconcile with the fact that the final version of the bill approved by the State Senate in the last session was supported by the Massachusetts Municipal Association, the organization that actually represents the towns and cities of the state. http://www.mma.org/public-works-energy-a-utilities/4406-senate-oks-revised-wind-siting-bill

  8. Seth Kaplan

    For those who want an objective compilation of views on the impact of wind turbines on property values take a look at what the National Association of Realtors has compiled on their website. http://www.realtor.org/library/library/fg509

    As to the Massachusetts Wind Facilities Siting Bill – the idea that it would destroy local control is very hard to reconcile with the fact that the final version of the bill approved by the State Senate in the last session was supported by the Massachusetts Municipal Association, the organization that actually represents the towns and cities of the state. http://www.mma.org/public-works-energy-a-utilities/4406-senate-oks-revised-wind-siting-bill

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