An Incomplete Guide to the Massachusetts Ballot: If the Question is One, the Answer is NO.

Rafael Mares | @RafaelMares2

As Massachusetts voters look to the November ballot, they have an opportunity to take a stand for a better, sustainable transportation system by voting No on Question 1. This first of four questions on the ballot would eliminate indexing of the gas tax to inflation, a development that would simply be bad for the environment. To meet the greenhouse gas reductions that science tells us are necessary, we must transform the way we plan for and invest in transportation infrastructure.

Transportation is the largest and fastest growing source of greenhouse gases in Massachusetts, responsible for more than a third of emissions in the state. To curb those emissions, we must reduce our reliance on cars by giving people more choices in how to get around. We need a transportation system that allows more people to travel to work, school, and other life necessities on foot, bike, or public transportation. A stronger, more environmentally sustainable transportation system will also boost regional economic competitiveness, enhance quality of life and public health, make Massachusetts more affordable, reduce energy use, and achieve greater social justice.

©Joe Flood

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Without sufficient funding for transportation, however, such a transformation is not possible.

The reality is that it is not possible to run even our current transportation system without additional funding. More than half of the 5,120 bridges in Massachusetts are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete and 42% of the state’s roads are in poor or mediocre condition. Likewise, continued deferred maintenance of critical elements of the public transportation network threatens its safety and efficacy. It will take more, not fewer, resources to address not only these challenges, but those also presented by our changing climate.

A Yes vote on Question 1 would make things even worse by taking away existing gas tax revenues that we need to solve this public safety crisis – revenues that, under the state constitution, can only be used for transportation needs. If Question 1 were to prevail, it would put $1 billion in transportation investments in jeopardy over the next decade. The indexing of the gas tax was passed only last year as part of a larger transportation funding package. CLF, and its partners, worked hard to raise these necessary and new transportation dollars. While the Transportation Finance Act of 2013 raised a significant amount of money, it fell short of funding all of the state’s transportation needs. Passage of Question 1 would be a great setback for the progress we have made so far.

A No vote will not only preserve significant funding but it will send a clear message that we are against crumbling roads, bridges, and transit and for a better, more sustainable transportation system. You can support CLF’s efforts to keep Massachusetts environmentally safe and structurally sound by voting No on Question 1 in November. For more information check out the following website: http://saferoadsbridges.com/.  That leaves you with only three more statewide ballot questions to learn about; but who is keeping score?

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