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A North Atlantic Right Whale Family Tree
by Ashira Morris

This summer, 10 right whales died, including Wolverine, the great-grandson of famous right whale matriarch Kleenex. Each whale death this year means families lost mothers, fathers, siblings, and grandchildren — a family tree that’s losing branches. Calving mothers like Kleenex are crucial to the right whales’ survival.

Blog
Can You Slash Your Trash for One Week?
by Olivia Synoracki

We live surrounded by trash, especially single-use plastic. It’s in our homes, schools, restaurants, offices, communities, and the environment. There’s so much waste that it can be easy to miss its full scale in our lives. Manufacturers and brand owners have created this throw-away culture by mass-producing disposable goods. But when it comes time to…

Blog
The Ocean Has Saved Us. Now, It’s Our Turn to Save the Ocean.
by Priscilla Brooks

The world’s oceans are in dire straits. A startling UN report confirms what we at CLF have been saying for years: Without drastic measures to halt climate-damaging emissions and protect our oceans, life in New England, and around the world, will be forever changed. If we act now, we can still protect our oceans and way of life for future generations. But we don’t have a moment to waste.

Blog
Vermont Takes Next Steps in Stopping Toxic Plastic Pollution
by Jen Duggan

We use dangerous plastics for just minutes – plastics that poison us, plastics that trash our waters and wildlife, and plastics that throw fuel on the climate crisis fire. It’s time to tell the plastics industry enough is enough and kick our plastic habit for good. The only way to solve this problem is to eliminate the use of single-use plastic products and hold corporations accountable for the public health and environmental impacts of their toxic plastic trash.

Snowball
Thirty Years of Overfishing
by Ashira Morris

For the past 30 years, headline after headline has documented the decline of Atlantic cod. For the entire period of time, it’s been the same story over and over again: poor management, not enough protected areas, fewer and fewer cod.