coal-fired power plants

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Video: Historic Decision Could Mean the End of Coal in New Hampshire
by Tom Irwin

The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission recently reached an historic settlement that requires Eversource to sell all of its power plants in the state. This will force its old and inefficient coal-fired plants – including Merrimack Station in Bow – to compete on an open market against more economically and environmentally friendly sources of energy, like solar and wind. CLF…

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It’s Possible
by Peter Shelley

A walk along Boston Harbor today reveals a waterfront that’s both beautiful and vibrant. Water taxis and sailboats skim its waters; tourists and locals stroll along its shores; fishermen catch striped bass right off the docks; and waterside restaurants brighten the evening. It’s hard to believe that, barely a generation ago, this same harbor was…

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CLF Statement on Brayton Point Power Plant’s Notice of Intention to Shut Down by 2017
by Seth Kaplan

CLF Calls Plan Good News for Mass. and New England Communities and Environment, Underscores Need for Planning to Ensure Stable and Just Transition In response to the notice from the owners of the Brayton Point power plant to ISO New England announcing the company’s intentions of retiring all units of the Brayton Point coal- and…

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A Quest for Clean Air
by John Kassel

I’d like to introduce you to two CLF members who are making a difference for people and communities in New England. Tiffany Mellers is a working mom and Army reservist who lives in Bridgeport, Connecticut, in the shadow of Bridgeport Harbor Station, a coal- and oil-burning power plant that has been polluting that city for…

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Familiar Cautionary Tale Unfolding at Mt. Tom
by Shanna Cleveland

A familiar story appears to be unfolding at the Mt. Tom coal plant in Holyoke, Massachusetts. According to recently released documents, the owner submitted what is known as a Dynamic Delist Bid with ISO New England (ISO-NE), the operator of the New England electricity system and markets, and ISO-NE accepted the bid. This means that…

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Storm Clouds Gather Over Brayton Point
by Caitlin Peale Sloan

Coal-fired power is dying, not only across the nation, but across New England as well.  The region’s coal-fired power plant fleet has started to succumb to the costs of operating a coal-fired dinosaur in the age of energy efficiency, growing renewable electricity generation, and–for now–low natural gas prices. Predominantly coal-fired Brayton Point Station in Somerset,…

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Northern Pass Developers Refuse to Face Facts about Hydropower Emissions
by Christophe Courchesne

The American developers of the Northern Pass project are misleading the public about the project’s most touted environmental benefit (without which they “wouldn’t be doing this”): reducing New England’s greenhouse gas emissions. Presented with clear, unambiguous evidence that the current proposal would not meaningfully reduce emissions and that their public relations campaign is trading in…

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Northern Pass Response to Hydropower Emissions Research Rings Hollow
by Christophe Courchesne

We appreciate Northern Pass spokesman Martin Murray’s comment on my prior post regarding recent research on the greenhouse gas emissions of hydropower and the implications for the Northern Pass project. We are also grateful for Hydro-Québec environment advisor Dr. Alain Tremblay’s comment, to which I responded here. Although we welcome the feedback and dialogue, we…

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Latest Research: Northern Pass Worse for the Climate than Advertised
by Christophe Courchesne

Reducing the region’s emissions of greenhouse gases is supposedly the Northern Pass project’s marquee public benefit, its raison d’être as they say in Québec. But would the Northern Pass project do the job? The answer appears to be: probably not any time soon. Today, CLF is releasing a ground-breaking new technical report regarding the greenhouse…

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When a Fact Check Goes Wrong and Misses the (Clean Energy) Point
by Seth Kaplan

The rise of dedicated public fact checking services like PolitiFact, FactCheck.org and the Washington Post Fact Checker has been a generally good thing. However, these services can go astray when they decide that a statement which would be improved with clarification is “false” – a practice that weakens the “false” label when it is applied to an outright falsehood.