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Progress for Great Bay: Exeter Agrees to Major Pollution Reductions
by Peter Wellenberger

Algae Growth in the Winnicut River, Greenland, NH; photo by Peter W. In early January, the Town of Exeter’s Selectmen voted 5 to 0 not to appeal a permit issued by the EPA – a permit that will require a major upgrade of its sewage treatment plant. Exeter becomes the second Great Bay community to…

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A Campaign of Delay – Jeopardizing the Health of Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Officials from Portsmouth, Dover and Rochester – in their continuing campaign to delay critically important pollution reductions in the Great Bay estuary – have put the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on notice that they intend to file suit over the nitrogen discharge levels being proposed in their wastewater treatment permits. As part of this campaign…

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Bellamy River – A Hidden Gem In the Great Bay Estuary
by Peter Wellenberger

There are seven rivers that drain into the Great Bay estuary, carrying freshwater runoff – as well as pollutants – from 52 communities including 10 in Maine. The Bellamy River, which flows into Little Bay, originates from Swains Lake in Barrington and flows east through the Bellamy Reservoir in Madbury and then through the City…

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OpEd: Save Great Bay Before It’s Too Late
by Peter Wellenberger

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper, along with the Coastal Conservation Association of NH, Great Bay Trout Unlimited and the NH Coastal Protection Partnership, coauthored the following editorial to The Portsmouth Herald. A copy of this OpEd was originally published in The Portsmouth Herald. You can find a copy of it online here. April 13 — To…

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Growing the Right Way on the Seacoast
by Peter Wellenberger

We often hear that increasing the amount of impervious cover – surfaces such as roadways and parking lots – leads to more stormwater runoff and declining water quality. So how does a community grow and avoid adding new pollution sources? One key strategy is directing new, appropriate development into existing town centers and downtowns. The…

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Participate in the Future of Great Bay Estuary: Voice Your Support for Needed Protections at EPA’s February 9 Public Hearing in Dover, NH.
by Peter Wellenberger

On Thursday, February 9, the EPA is holding a public hearing on a new Clean Water Act discharge permit for the City of Dover’s sewage treatment plant. The hearing involves a decision that will be critical to the health of the Great Bay estuary. We urge all who care about the future health of the estuary to attend. The hearing takes place at 7:00 pm in the McConnell Center located at 61 Locust Street (Room 306).