electricity

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Experts Weigh In: Maine Doesn’t Need New Gas Pipelines
by Ivria Glass Fried

This week consultants hired by the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) concluded that Maine should not enter into contracts to purchase gas pipeline capacity because the costs of doing so would outweigh the benefits to Mainers. In many ways, this was a foregone conclusion – one that CLF predicted nearly a year ago and that the PUC itself (unofficially) reached before soliciting proposals from pipeline companies and spending taxpayer dollars on a lengthy consultant’s report. It’s a cautionary tale not just for Maine but for all of New England as the region weighs its energy future – and decides whether it will overinvest in natural gas or blaze a trail based on cleaner, renewable resources.

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UPDATE: Take Action: Restore Energy Efficiency Funding in Maine
by Ben Tettlebaum

With one stroke of his veto pen, Governor Paul LePage planned to wipe out more than $35 million in funding for energy efficiency in Maine, which would have cost Mainers $200 million a year in lost savings and higher energy bills. But Maine’s legislature stood strong, overriding the governor’s veto and restoring the state’s energy efficiency funding.

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The Alternatives to New Natural Gas Pipelines
by Caitlin Peale Sloan

Now that we’ve made it through the winter, policymakers in Massachusetts are taking a look at the state of energy in the Commonwealth and trying to sort out what to do about the big energy policy questions currently on the table. First among these questions is what, if any, public policy support and funding should…

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A Single Word Could Restore Maine Energy Efficiency Funding
by Ben Tettlebaum

A recent decision by the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC) severely limits energy efficiency funding in the state. If the decision stands, Efficiency Maine Trust – the public entity that runs energy efficiency programs – would see its near-term budget cut from about $60 million to $22 million. This drastic cut in energy efficiency funding…

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Quiet and Hardworking: Energy Efficiency
by Sandy Levine

We all know them. Every family and office has at least one. That quiet and hardworking member of the team that day in and day out gets the job done. No fanfare needed. Just consistently delivering results. In the world of energy, that quiet and hardworking team member is energy efficiency. Every day, it cuts…

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The Final Word on Winter in New England’s Energy Markets, Part II: Why This Winter Was Different
by Christophe Courchesne

As late as last fall, many observers and traders watching the New England energy markets were predicting a repeat of last year’s very expensive winter, or worse. By January, CLF was able to post an update showing that those predictions weren’t materializing. In fact, the expected energy crisis was fizzling, with much lower wholesale power…

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As Cold Sets In, the New England Winter Energy “Crisis” Fizzles
by Christophe Courchesne

As of this writing (mid-January), we’re reaching the end of our first major cold snap here in New England, so let’s take stock of how New England’s electric system and market are faring. In short, we are doing much better than expected, to the great surprise of the many “experts” who have said we are…

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Why Is Hydro-Québec So Intent on Overselling Its Hydropower?, Part III
by Christophe Courchesne

With the stresses that winter places on New England’s electric grid right around the corner, it’s a good time to revisit a crucial issue with increasing our reliance on hydropower imports from Canada—their reliability. The cause for concern? Last January, a very cold month, Hydro-Québec chose to curtail its exports to New England 24 times,…