great bay estuary

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Cleaning Up Great Bay – One Volunteer at a Time
by Peter Wellenberger

If you look around the Seacoast, you will discover some remarkable volunteers helping to protect the Great Bay estuary. Recognizing that stormwater is a major source of nitrogen pollution, these volunteers are leading the way to cleaner water by simply lending a hand. Durham is one Great Bay community implementing innovative solutions to reduce stormwater pollution.…

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Great Bay Waterkeeper- New Study Confirms We Are All Responsible
by Peter Wellenberger

The NH Department of Environmental Services recently released its long-awaited draft Great Bay Non-Point Source Nitrogen Study, providing a breakdown of the sources of nitrogen pollution in the estuary, and additional insights on how to improve and protect water quality. According to the draft study, the Great Bay estuary receives, on average, a total load…

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Golfing Green on the Seacoast
by Peter Wellenberger

At the Sagamore-Hampton Golf Club in North Hampton, maintaining grass is a science. And that’s a very good thing. Did you know there are six golf courses in just the Winnicut River watershed alone?  And that’s just one small portion of the estuary. It should come as no surprise that fertilizer is considered one of…

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A Powerful Vote for Clean Water
by Peter Wellenberger

Residents of Newmarket, New Hampshire went to the polls on Tuesday and sent a powerful message: that clean water is essential, and that we need to make needed investments to support it. Up for vote yesterday was a warrant article to fund the $14 million construction of a major upgrade to the town’s sewage treatment…

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Newmarket Continues on Path to a Cleaner Estuary
by Peter Wellenberger

Like many other communities in the Seacoast, Newmarket is faced with an aging and outdated sewage treatment plant. As the health of the Great Bay estuary continues to decline, the town is committed to being part of the solution. Fortunately, Newmarket – along with Exeter – has decided the best way to move forward is…

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We Heart Estuaries!
by Robin Just

Why does CLF heart estuaries? For so many reasons. Estuaries are one of nature’s great ideas. Not just an elegant transition from freshwater to saltwater, estuaries also provide rich feeding grounds for coastal birds and are important places for fish and other marine life to reproduce. Their sheltered waters and unique vegetation provide juvenile animals…

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Progress for Great Bay: Exeter Agrees to Major Pollution Reductions
by Peter Wellenberger

Algae Growth in the Winnicut River, Greenland, NH; photo by Peter W. In early January, the Town of Exeter’s Selectmen voted 5 to 0 not to appeal a permit issued by the EPA – a permit that will require a major upgrade of its sewage treatment plant. Exeter becomes the second Great Bay community to…

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Rochester and Dover Jeopardize the Great Bay’s Recovery
by Peter Wellenberger

In a move that will further delay progress cleaning up the Great Bay estuary, the Cities of Rochester and Dover, NH, have appealed a critical permit recently issued by the EPA to address the mounting problem of nitrogen pollution in the Great Bay estuary. Whose permit did they appeal? Incredibly, Rochester and Dover are expending…

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Where Have All the Fish Gone?
by Peter Wellenberger

As I travel around the Seacoast, it is such a pleasure to talk with people who share my love for Great Bay.  Recently, I made a presentation to the Durham Garden Club – a group that recognizes the importance of clean water – and ran into an old friend who cares deeply about the health…

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Lawns To Lobsters – Fewer Chemicals, Cleaner Water
by Peter Wellenberger

Stormwater continues to be a major source of pollution to the Great Bay estuary. When it rains, runoff carries a wide range of pollutants – from dog waste and lawn fertilizers, to gasoline and oil, to heavy metals, nutrients and sediments – that flow into our waters with little or no treatment. To combat this…