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Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper

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Great Bay Waterkeeper- New Study Confirms We Are All Responsible
by Peter Wellenberger

The NH Department of Environmental Services recently released its long-awaited draft Great Bay Non-Point Source Nitrogen Study, providing a breakdown of the sources of nitrogen pollution in the estuary, and additional insights on how to improve and protect water quality. According to the draft study, the Great Bay estuary receives, on average, a total load…

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Newmarket Continues on Path to a Cleaner Estuary
by Peter Wellenberger

Like many other communities in the Seacoast, Newmarket is faced with an aging and outdated sewage treatment plant. As the health of the Great Bay estuary continues to decline, the town is committed to being part of the solution. Fortunately, Newmarket – along with Exeter – has decided the best way to move forward is…

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We Heart Estuaries!
by Robin Just

Why does CLF heart estuaries? For so many reasons. Estuaries are one of nature’s great ideas. Not just an elegant transition from freshwater to saltwater, estuaries also provide rich feeding grounds for coastal birds and are important places for fish and other marine life to reproduce. Their sheltered waters and unique vegetation provide juvenile animals…

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Rochester and Dover Jeopardize the Great Bay’s Recovery
by Peter Wellenberger

In a move that will further delay progress cleaning up the Great Bay estuary, the Cities of Rochester and Dover, NH, have appealed a critical permit recently issued by the EPA to address the mounting problem of nitrogen pollution in the Great Bay estuary. Whose permit did they appeal? Incredibly, Rochester and Dover are expending…

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Where Have All the Fish Gone?
by Peter Wellenberger

As I travel around the Seacoast, it is such a pleasure to talk with people who share my love for Great Bay.  Recently, I made a presentation to the Durham Garden Club – a group that recognizes the importance of clean water – and ran into an old friend who cares deeply about the health…

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Lawns To Lobsters – Fewer Chemicals, Cleaner Water
by Peter Wellenberger

Stormwater continues to be a major source of pollution to the Great Bay estuary. When it rains, runoff carries a wide range of pollutants – from dog waste and lawn fertilizers, to gasoline and oil, to heavy metals, nutrients and sediments – that flow into our waters with little or no treatment. To combat this…

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A Campaign of Delay – Jeopardizing the Health of Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Officials from Portsmouth, Dover and Rochester – in their continuing campaign to delay critically important pollution reductions in the Great Bay estuary – have put the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on notice that they intend to file suit over the nitrogen discharge levels being proposed in their wastewater treatment permits. As part of this campaign…

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Pavement Sealcoats – Make the Right Choice
by Peter Wellenberger

As I drive around the Seacoast, I see a lot of people getting their driveways resealed. Perhaps people are anxious to get this done before the onset of winter. I wonder, though, if homeowners realize there are different types of sealcoats and that choosing the right one can help protect the environment and our health.…

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Bellamy River – A Hidden Gem In the Great Bay Estuary
by Peter Wellenberger

There are seven rivers that drain into the Great Bay estuary, carrying freshwater runoff – as well as pollutants – from 52 communities including 10 in Maine. The Bellamy River, which flows into Little Bay, originates from Swains Lake in Barrington and flows east through the Bellamy Reservoir in Madbury and then through the City…

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Restoring Oyster Populations in Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Most people don’t realize that oysters are only found in estuaries. At one time, oysters thrived throughout the Great Bay estuary and were highly desired for human consumption. Because oysters filter the water to feed, they also help to remove pollutants and nutrients and play an important role in keeping our estuaries clean. Unfortunately, it…