Great Bay

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Video: Nitrogen Reductions Around Great Bay
by Jeff Barnum

A weight of evidence has made clear that excessive nitrogen is detrimental to the health of Great Bay, with vast acreages of eelgrass – the cornerstone of the ecosystem – having disappeared. In fact, it would be highly unlikely to find any eelgrass at all from New Castle all the way upriver and to Adams…

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Local Engagement, Local Waters
by Jeff Barnum

As Great Bay–Piscataqua Waterkeeper, I consider local public engagement to be key to restoring the health of the Great Bay estuary, and it’s a major part of my work. But even for those already aware of the value of our local waters and the challenges of achieving clean water, getting engaged often is not easy. People…

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Portsmouth to Proceed with Long-Awaited, New Sewage Treatment Plant
by Jeff Barnum

The Portsmouth, New Hampshire, City Council recently reaffirmed its commitment to build a new sewage treatment plant at the site of the present antiquated facility on Peirce Island. Completion of the long-awaited upgrade may still be a few years away, though it could have happened sooner if the City had elected to shift its plans…

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Waterkeeper Vessel Launched for 2015!
by Jeff Barnum

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper vessel is back on the water for its second season. Interest is keen from folks who want to climb aboard and explore Great Bay and the Piscataqua River and other waters up close, and to discuss the challenges facing the estuary and the solutions for securing its health.

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In Exeter, Another Vote for Clean Water
by Jeff Barnum

By a wide margin, the citizens of Exeter, New Hampshire, recently rejected a move to reduce the size of wetland buffers in their community. As I discussed in a recent blog, buffers are an important tool for protecting both the health of our wetlands and water quality. Considering the significant challenges facing our Great Bay…

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Exeter Residents to Vote for Clean Water
by Jeff Barnum

On Tuesday, March 11, residents of Exeter, NH, will have an important opportunity to vote “YES” for clean water. Voting on Article 6, residents will be asked to approve a $5 million bond to begin engineering design of a new sewage treatment plant. Exeter’s current sewage treatment plant is grossly outdated. The much-needed new plant,…

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Can Great Bay Oysters be Saved for a Healthier Estuary?
by Jeff Barnum

In a recent blog, I discussed our work to clean up toxic stormwater pollution from the massive scrap metal facility on the banks of the Piscataqua River in Portsmouth.  One important outcome of our work was to secure funding from the operator of that facility, through EPA, for an oyster and eelgrass restoration project in…

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We Heart Estuaries!
by Robin Just

Why does CLF heart estuaries? For so many reasons. Estuaries are one of nature’s great ideas. Not just an elegant transition from freshwater to saltwater, estuaries also provide rich feeding grounds for coastal birds and are important places for fish and other marine life to reproduce. Their sheltered waters and unique vegetation provide juvenile animals…

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40 Years Later, Would We Pass the Clean Water Act Today?
by Chris Kilian

I love rivers.  In fact, I love all things water. And so today I’m celebrating the 40th birthday of the Clean Water Act, perhaps America’s most effective and far-reaching environmental law. I grew up on a farm in upstate New York and spent a lot of time stomping around in our ponds, streams, and wetlands…

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A Campaign of Delay – Jeopardizing the Health of Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Officials from Portsmouth, Dover and Rochester – in their continuing campaign to delay critically important pollution reductions in the Great Bay estuary – have put the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on notice that they intend to file suit over the nitrogen discharge levels being proposed in their wastewater treatment permits. As part of this campaign…