Great Bay

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Green Slime or Clean Water: What’s the Future of Great Bay?
by Peter Wellenberger

A week ago I had the pleasure of attending an event to celebrate the restoration of a tidal river. The Winnicut River – primarily located in Greenland, NH – is now the only dam-free river in the Great Bay estuary. Thanks to the hard work of the Winnicut River Watershed Coalition and numerous state and federal agencies, the project includes a new fish passage and, in addition to the dam removal, a restored shoreline.

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Striped Bass Anglers – Your Help is Needed!
by Peter Wellenberger

With summer right around the corner, striped bass are starting to arrive in New Hampshire’s coastal waters. With their arrival, anglers from near and far flock to the state’s coastal rivers, estuaries and ocean waters to pursue this popular sport fish. The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department is conducting a Striped Bass Volunteer Angler Survey and they need your help! The annual striped bass survey has been ongoing since 1993 and the information collected is used in the annual coast-wide stock assessment for striped bass.

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OpEd: Save Great Bay Before It’s Too Late
by Peter Wellenberger

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper, along with the Coastal Conservation Association of NH, Great Bay Trout Unlimited and the NH Coastal Protection Partnership, coauthored the following editorial to The Portsmouth Herald. A copy of this OpEd was originally published in The Portsmouth Herald. You can find a copy of it online here. April 13 — To…

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UNH Master Plan Fails to Protect Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

UNH recently presented its new master plan to the larger University community. The plan includes entering into public-private ventures to develop retail and commercial space – stores – on existing agricultural land. On the UNH web page, it states the school “is at the forefront of the efforts to define new personal, local community, governmental…

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CLF Motion to Protect Great Bay from the Municipal Coalition
by Peter Wellenberger

Last week, I discussed how the municipalities that comprise the so-called Great Bay Municipal Coalition took the unfortunate step of filing a lawsuit against the N.H. Department of Environmental Services, challenging its analysis of nitrogen pollution in the estuary. In an effort to prevent delays in solving Great Bay’s pollution problems, late last week CLF…

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Innovative Stormwater Approaches Essential for a Healthy Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Stormwater pollution continues to be one of the greatest threats to the health of the Great Bay estuary. Fortunately, innovative approaches to development can dramatically reduce and even eliminate polluted runoff and the damage it can cause to our water bodies. We have a great example of innovation here in the estuary’s watershed, in Greenland.…

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Participate in the Future of Great Bay Estuary: Voice Your Support for Needed Protections at EPA’s February 9 Public Hearing in Dover, NH.
by Peter Wellenberger

On Thursday, February 9, the EPA is holding a public hearing on a new Clean Water Act discharge permit for the City of Dover’s sewage treatment plant. The hearing involves a decision that will be critical to the health of the Great Bay estuary. We urge all who care about the future health of the estuary to attend. The hearing takes place at 7:00 pm in the McConnell Center located at 61 Locust Street (Room 306).

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Talking Eelgrass
by Robin Just

When we talk about fish, it’s good to remember that they not only come from somewhere but that that somewhere makes the fish. Habitat is essential; without it even many migratory fish won’t have a place to call home. Many North Atlantic fish spend an important part of their life cycles in coastal eelgrass habitat, and eelgrass is declining.

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The Perfect Time for a Waterkeeper
by Peter Wellenberger

There could not be a more perfect time for a Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper. Working with CLF, I view one of my key roles as rallying citizens and communities around one purpose, cleaning up the estuary. Everyone living here has an impact on the estuary in one way or another. It is our responsibility to limit that impact and become better stewards of our environment. Whether you live near the Squamscott River in Newfields or Stratham, or near Spinney Creek on the Maine side, we all need be more involved in the decisions that will determine the future of this wonderful natural resource.