Massachusetts

Blog
Bee Grateful! Pollinator Protection Bills to be Heard by the Massachusetts Legislature on 11/17
by Annie Lemelin

On Tuesday, November 17, the Massachusetts Legislature’s Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources, and Agriculture will hold a public hearing for a trio of bills relating to pollinator health: H. 731, H. 3417, and H. 655. A previous CLF blog post outlined the importance of pollinator health, detailed the alarming recent decline in honey bee…

Blog
Governor Baker: The People Have Spoken, and They Want a Marine National Monument
by Priscilla Brooks

The people of New England, and especially Massachusetts, have spoken – and they want a Marine National Monument in the Atlantic. More than 160,000 people have signed their name in support of a monument designation, including over 10,000 from Massachusetts alone. We’ve received public letters of support from coastal businesses, faith-based organizations, and aquaria. And…

Blog
Guest Blog: Fuel Tracking Makes Sense for Massachusetts
by Jenny Rushlow

Conservation Law Foundation has been working closely with the Union of Concerned Scientists and other partners to advance legislation that would implement transportation fuel tracking in Massachusetts. What is fuel tracking and why is it important? David Babson, senior engineer for Union of Concerned Scientists’ Clean Vehicles Program explains: I have been traveling to Massachusetts…

Blog
Governor Baker’s Solar Bill Misses the Mark
by David Ismay

Anticipating the release of his promised solar power legislation, we encouraged Governor Baker to be bold in strengthening and continuing the solar-friendly policies, including net metering, that have made Massachusetts a national leader in solar energy. Unfortunately, his proposed bill falls well short of that goal. At a time when our changing climate demands urgent action…

Blog
This Week on TalkingFish.org – August 10-14
by Allison Lorenc

August 10 – Atlantic Halibut – Don’t Let the Googly Eyes Fool You – Today, we’re talking about a monstrous flatfish – the voracious, predacious Atlantic halibut. Like all flatfish, Atlantic halibut lie on their left sides, giving them a goofy, almost crooked appearance. But don’t be fooled – their mouths gape all the way back…