Ocean Conservation

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What Single-Celled Diatoms Know That We Can’t Seem To Take Seriously
by Peter Shelley

A recent scientific article from four Maine ocean scientists reminded me of a not-very-good environmental joke. An archangel was reporting to God all the terrible things that humans had done to the earth’s environment. God listened patiently as the list expanded, interjecting regularly that the archangel was not to worry; these events had all been anticipated. But when the angel reported that there was now a hole in the ozone layer, God bolted upright in shock: “I told them not to mess with the ozone layer!”

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Waves of Change: Making a Plan for Coastal Pollution
by Hannah Dean

It’s July, it’s hot, and – as long as there are no big sharks around – you’d like to go swimming. There’s only one problem: you get to the beach and find out you might get sick if you go in the water. In New England, it’s more likely than not that the unhealthy water…

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New England’s Oceans: National Pride, National Treasure
by John Kassel

This week, along with millions of Americans, I will cheer at a parade, join a BBQ, and watch fireworks. I will do this with my family, in a familiar place, with familiar faces, and celebrate this most American of holidays. July 4th has always meant a great deal to me, first as an American boy growing…

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Waves of Change: Planning for New England’s Unprecedented Sea Level Rise
by Robin Just

Sea levels are rising 3-4 times faster along the east coast, from North Carolina to Massachusetts, than the global average, says a new study by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This “hot spot” of rising water puts us at unique risk from the changes that are happening to our ocean and will “increase the…

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Colleagues, Friends, Family: New England Won’t Thrive Without Them
by John Kassel

As most of you know, I had one of those painful (and thankfully rare) life experiences this month that reinforce our natural instinct that people matter most of all in life. Thank you all for your kind wishes and support. It made a big difference.

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Meet the Pteropods
by Robin Just

Pteropods are little mollusks (related to snails, slugs and squid) that drift around in ocean currents, feeding on nutrient-rich plankton. Their rich diet makes them delicious to many fish. Seals eat many fish, and sharks eat seals and fish, so there it is: not even 6 degrees of shark separation. Sharks need pteropods, and so do you.

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This Week on TalkingFish.org – November 28-December 2
by Samantha Caravello

Catch up with the latest news from TalkingFish.org, a blog brought to you by CLF and other organizations and individuals who want to see a sustainable fishing industry in New England and abundant fish populations for generations to come.

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No New Drilling in New England
by Winston Vaughan

Earlier this week Secretary Salazar announced the Department of the Interior’s five-year proposal for oil and gas leases in our nation’s oceans. Much to the relief of New England’s fishermen, beachgoers, and coastal businesses, the Obama Administration’s proposal keeps the oil industry out of New England’s ocean and the rest of the Atlantic coast. CLF…

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This week in Talking Fish
by Samantha Caravello

Catch up with the latest news from TalkingFish.org, a blog brought to you by CLF and other organizations and individuals who want to see a sustainable fishing industry in New England and abundant fish populations for generations to come. TalkingFish.org aims to increase people’s understanding of the scientific, financial and social aspects at work in…

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Ocean advocates get louder against political games
by Sean Cosgrove

As Tricia Jedele recently reported, the US Senate is debating the funding for ocean management programs this week. The National Ocean Policy is certainly one Obama Administration initiative that deserves adequate funding and particularly, as we in New England know better than most, the program for comprehensive ocean planning is one that we can all benefit…