Outer Continental Shelf

Blog
Join Us in Opposing Trump Administration’s Oil and Gas Drilling Plans
by Amanda Yanchury

[Update: Public meetings postponed due to the federal government shutdown have been rescheduled. The New England dates are as follows: Feb. 13 – Hartford, CT; Feb. 27 – Boston, MA; Feb. 28 – Providence, RI; March 5 – Concord, NH; March 7 – Augusta, ME. Sign up to attend a meeting near you here. There are also coordinated opposition events concurrent…

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President Obama Bans Atlantic and Arctic Drilling
by Peter Shelley

In another major victory for the environment and ocean conservation before President-elect Trump takes office, President Obama has banned offshore oil and gas drilling in large expanses of the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. To do so, the President used the authority granted to him by the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act of 1953, which states:…

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Offshore Wind Public Information Sessions in MA & RI
by Ivy Frignoca

Last week the development of wind energy offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts moved one step closer with the publication of an environmental assessment (EA) by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Ocean Management (BOEM) regarding commercial wind lease issuance and site assessment activities on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The purpose of the EA is to determine whether or not issuance of leases and approval of site assessment plans within a designated area offshore Rhode Island and Massachusetts would lead to reasonably foreseeable and significant impacts on the environment.

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Massachusetts and Federal Government Team Up to Tap Abundant Offshore Wind Energy Resource
by N. Jonathan Peress

Earlier today my colleague Sue Reid, VP & Director of CLF Massachusetts, joined state and federal officials to announce the latest milestone for obtaining plentiful and clean renewable wind energy from the Outer Continental Shelf offshore of Massachusetts. Specifically, they initiated the process for developers to begin leasing and site assessment, and for data gathering and public input, to facilitate off shore wind deployment in an area approximately 12 nautical miles south of Martha’s Vineyard and 13 nautical miles southwest of Nantucket. The “Call Area” as it is termed, was identified following consultation with ocean users, such as fishermen and other stakeholders, through an intergovernmental renewable energy task force led by Massachusetts officials.