Shark Week

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Last Week on TalkingFish.org – July 6-10
by Allison Lorenc

July 6 – SOS! Save Our (Atlantic) Salmon – Last week, we focused on the Atlantic sturgeon, a species listed as endangered or threatened throughout the mid-Atlantic – it’s no surprise these fish are off the menu. But what about Atlantic salmon, the most-consumed species of salmon (the second most-consumed type of seafood) in the U.S.? Fish…

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This Week on TalkingFish.org – August 5-9
by Leah Fine

This week on Talking Fish, Peter Shelley attempts to kick off Shark Week by trying dogfish; bad management, not scientific uncertainty, is to blame for the groundfish crisis; the Island Institute hosts a symposium on fisheries and climate change; in Fish Talk in the News, President Obama nominates Kathryn Sullivan to lead NOAA, and the agency refuses to list river herring under the Endangered Species Act.

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Healthy Sharks – Healthy Oceans
by Robin Just

“I love diving with makos, but they have a very different behavior than other sharks. They come in appearing to be more agitated. They’re much more hyper and jacked up.” – Brian Skerry Mako sharks are built to move. They are very acrobatic – sometimes leaping high into the air –and are also extremely fast. Some…

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Meet the Pteropods
by Robin Just

Pteropods are little mollusks (related to snails, slugs and squid) that drift around in ocean currents, feeding on nutrient-rich plankton. Their rich diet makes them delicious to many fish. Seals eat many fish, and sharks eat seals and fish, so there it is: not even 6 degrees of shark separation. Sharks need pteropods, and so do you.

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Shark Week Series: Risk and Fear
by Robin Just

Many rational people are very afraid of sharks. We can tell ourselves that the odds of attack are extremely low, especially in New England, but the primal image of the gaping maw and jagged teeth is hard to drive away with logic.

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Shark Week Series: What Makes Sharks So Special?
by Robin Just

Great whites, makos, porbeagles, and salmon sharks are among the very few warm-blooded fish. I’m not going to hug them, though, since it makes them more efficient predators.