Waves of Change: Taking on the Threat of Ocean Garbage

Sean Cosgrove

Trash on a New England beach

Walking the sandy beaches of the Cape and Islands, kayaking the marshes and salt ponds, or scrambling around the rocky shores of Maine will almost always provide three things: a great outdoor experience, a chance to explore and learn about nature and the amazing diversity of life, and a full review of the waste, refuse, garbage, and pollutants that we cast onto our rivers, shores, and oceans.

While being blessed with the chance to take a recent early morning hike around my favorite little Massachusetts island, I calculated an assortment of the following: the smashed remnants of dozens of lobster traps, several plastic and metal buckets, beer cans, more beer cans, an unopened plastic bottle of cranberry juice (I didn’t try to drink it), a refrigerator door which was probably 30 years old, plastic food wrappers, auto oil filters, boat oil filters, one pretty large piece of fiberglass part from someone’s unfortunately lost vessel, dozens of miles of discarded fishing line, nets and other assorted fishing gear, flip-flops, sandals and shoes, 50 gallon drums, an unused emergency smoke bomb, about two dozen assorted rubber gloves (mostly lefts), about one dozen assorted rubber boots (mostly rights), a vast amount of the highly predictable but still depressing plastic bottles, a few glass bottles, an oddly-placed large chunk of asphalt, a metal chair, some random pieces of wood pallets and tree stumps, two umbrellas, pesticide spray bottles, one display of typical latex birthday party balloons, and two separate displays of very fancy Mylar celebratory balloons.

While shocking in its abundance, it was still a fairly standard composition of junk. Policy makers refer to this aspect of ocean management as “marine debris.” Honestly, I think we can just call it “ocean garbage.” Ocean garbage is a longtime and ever increasing problem. The type of materials we put into waterways and on our beaches in the modern era tend to be more toxic and long-lived than the flotsam and jetsam of past centuries. The debris floating across the Pacific from the terrible tsunami that devastated the coast of Japan last year has brought some attention to the problem, as has the media report so the massive garbage patches. Believe it or not, even the thousands of tons of stuff from a single event such as the tsunami is dwarfed by the annual build-up of daily deposits.

There are some good folks, however, who are not going to take this problem lying down. One tremendous collaborative effort is the annual International Coastal Cleanup which is organized each year by our good friends at the Ocean Conservancy. The 2012 ICC, as it is known, happens this Saturday, Sept. 15. Thousands of people around this country and others will volunteer for a day to gather up the coastal and ocean garbage and responsibly deposit it in landfills. You can help out too!

A challenge this broad really does require broad coordination and collaboration. The National Ocean Policy provides the forum for state officials, federal agencies, municipalities and other ocean user groups to help tackle the threat of marine debris. Regional ocean planning is certainly a great tool for coordination in New England.

Focus Areas

Oceans

Places

Massachusetts

4 Responses to “Waves of Change: Taking on the Threat of Ocean Garbage”

  1. Tricia Jedele

    Here! Here! And, if you can’t be on a beach to help clean it up on September 15th, here are a few things we can all do to diminish the assortment Sean finds on his next end of summer stroll: If we can’t imagine a way to recycle, reuse or properly dispose of something, we shouldn’t be buying it. If we see a piece of garbage on a bike ride, walk, or outing, we should pretend that one of our children or grandchildren dropped it and we should pick it up and throw it away. Just because we didn’t put it there doesn’t mean we shouldn’t pick it up. Finally, take care of our local rivers. Everything we dump there ends up in the ocean.

  2. Tricia Jedele

    Here! Here! And, if you can’t be on a beach to help clean it up on September 15th, here are a few things we can all do to diminish the assortment Sean finds on his next end of summer stroll: If we can’t imagine a way to recycle, reuse or properly dispose of something, we shouldn’t be buying it. If we see a piece of garbage on a bike ride, walk, or outing, we should pretend that one of our children or grandchildren dropped it and we should pick it up and throw it away. Just because we didn’t put it there doesn’t mean we shouldn’t pick it up. Finally, take care of our local rivers. Everything we dump there ends up in the ocean.

  3. Tricia Jedele

    Here! Here! And, if you can’t be on a beach to help clean it up on September 15th, here are a few things we can all do to diminish the assortment Sean finds on his next end of summer stroll: If we can’t imagine a way to recycle, reuse or properly dispose of something, we shouldn’t be buying it. If we see a piece of garbage on a bike ride, walk, or outing, we should pretend that one of our children or grandchildren dropped it and we should pick it up and throw it away. Just because we didn’t put it there doesn’t mean we shouldn’t pick it up. Finally, take care of our local rivers. Everything we dump there ends up in the ocean.

  4. Tricia Jedele

    Here! Here! And, if you can’t be on a beach to help clean it up on September 15th, here are a few things we can all do to diminish the assortment Sean finds on his next end of summer stroll: If we can’t imagine a way to recycle, reuse or properly dispose of something, we shouldn’t be buying it. If we see a piece of garbage on a bike ride, walk, or outing, we should pretend that one of our children or grandchildren dropped it and we should pick it up and throw it away. Just because we didn’t put it there doesn’t mean we shouldn’t pick it up. Finally, take care of our local rivers. Everything we dump there ends up in the ocean.

Leave a Reply

About the CLF Blog

The views and opinions expressed on this blog do not necessarily represent the opinions or positions of Conservation Law Foundation, our boards, or our supporters.