This Week on TalkingFish.org – January 27-31

Leah Fine

January 27 – Climate Change and the Future of New England’s Fisheries – Following a successful two-day symposium this summer, Maine’s Island Institute has released a new report, A Climate of Change: Climate Change and New England Fisheries, that gathers observations on the effects of climate change on local fisheries and makes management recommendations for mitigating and adapting to these impacts.

January 28 – And the Beat Goes On – By Capt. Patrick Paquette. Despite over a decade of outcry from both the general public & multiple stakeholder groups within the fishing community, on this coming Thursday the New England Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) will once again be discussing the seemingly never ending question of how to monitor and regulate the very controversial fishing gear known as a “mid water trawl.” Many countries including Canada, with whom we share the Atlantic herring resource, have banned the use of this gear completely.

January 29 – Tearing the “Invisible Fabric” of Nature – A major recent study documents incidents of overfishing that pushed ecosystems beyond tipping points from which they could not rebound, “flipping” them into new states. The meta-study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences includes examples from around the world—from the Namibian coast and Nile Delta to right here in New England’s waters. In each, over-exploitation of resources triggered a domino effect in the food web, “fundamentally transforming ecosystems to those that are often less productive for fisheries, more prone to cycles of booms and busts, and thus less manageable.”

January 31 – Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 31 – In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the NEFMC meets and discusses Magnuson reauthorization; a new reality show seeks Maine fishermen; another study finds a link between climate change and shrinking fish; police say they have found the culprit in last summer’s oyster farm robberies; Maine and the Passamaquoddy tribe approach an agreement on elvers; a study recommends a multifaceted approach to EBFM; new research says depletion due to overfishing can be predicted; Rip Cunningham recommends caution in fishing low on the food chain; a Maine lawmaker introduces a bill to ban pesticides that could harm lobsters.

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