This Week on TalkingFish.org – May 19-23


May 19 – Reducing and Minimizing Bycatch – According to some estimates, as much as 40 percent of fish caught around the globe is discarded at sea, dead or dying. We can’t afford to continue this wasteful practice. Stopping the unnecessary squandering of nontarget fish in many U.S. fisheries and reducing the needless incidental killing of untold seabirds, whales, and other marine life by indiscriminate fishing gear is central to a new, national approach to ecosystem-based fisheries management.

May 22 – New England Inches Toward Improved Fisheries Management, But There’s a Catch – This week the New England Fishery Management Council holds the first meeting of a committee aiming to revive efforts on Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management, or EBFM. This is great news, but also greatly overdue.

May 23 – For World Fish Migration Day, Here Are Some Fish on the Go – Saturday is World Fish Migration Day, with events around the region to raise awareness about open rivers and migratory fish. To help you celebrate, here are a few videos and images of migrating fish and the people who move them.

May 23 – Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 23 – In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the FAO releases its State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture Report; river herring run across New England; NEFSC releases a new Ecosystem Advisory showing high sea surface temperatures; the NEFMC releases the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Omnibus Habitat Amendment; a new NOAA report shows the importance of shallow-water bottom habitat; volunteers count horseshoe crabs; Maine indefinitely closes part of the lower Penobscot to lobster fishing due to mercury contamination; a Maine lobsterman is charged for possessing undersized lobsters; Duxbury’s oyster farms thrive; Jon Grabowski develops a framework to evaluate fishing gear impacts on habitat types; sand lance return to Stellwagen and bring humpback whales with them.

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