This Week on TalkingFish.org – October 24-28


October 25: Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, October 25 – In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NOAA Fisheries announces a new NEFSC Director; the New York Times highlights successful dam removals in Maine; tropical fish arrive in Cape Cod waters; Gorton’s Seafood taps into consumer demand to meet new market challenges; lowly soft sediments are essential for productive fisheries; and a U.S. court say animals can be listed as threatened if climate change poses a risk. In the News, by Talking Fish.

October 26: NYT Op-Ed: Not Just Another Stinky Fish – Menhaden is “not just another stinky fish” but an important forage species that predators, such as whales and ospreys, and other fish depend on. The ASMFC is voting today on menhaden catch limits for 2017 with pressure from the industry to increase quotas. The commission, however, should consider an ecosystem-based approach and maintain the current catch limits. Opinion, cross-post by Talking Fish.

October 27: NOAA Fisheries releases 2015 “U.S. Fisheries Yearbook” – Yesterday, NOAA Fisheries released its annual Fisheries of the United States report for 2015, which the agency refers to as the “yearbook of fishery statistics for the United States.” It provides information on commercial and recreational fisheries as well as aquaculture production. New England Fisheries, by Talking Fish.

October 28: Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 28 – In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, regulators increase the menhaden catch limit; Americans added an extra pound of seafood to their diet in 2015; a recent fish kill spurs demand that the feds tie dam licensing to safeguards; Maine shellfish farming could quadruple by 2030; and tar sand oil shipped through the Gulf of Maine poses a treat. In the News, by Talking Fish.

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