Conservation Law Foundation Statement on Supreme Judicial Court Proceeding Regarding Cape Wind

Samantha Caravello

CONTACT:
Karen Wood, CLF, (617) 850-1722, kwood@clf.org
Seth Kaplan, CLF, (617) 850-1721, skaplan@clf.org

Boston, MASeptember 8, 2011– Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) issued the following statement in defense of the Cape Wind power purchase agreement, currently being disputed by opponents of the project. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court heard oral arguments on the case today.

Seth Kaplan, Vice President for Policy and Climate Advocacy at Conservation Law Foundation, said, “The Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (DPU) left no stone unturned when it reviewed and approved the contract between National Grid and Cape Wind. The DPU’s conclusion, based on extensive testimony and other evidence presented by both Cape Wind supporters and opponents, was that Cape Wind’s long-term power purchase agreement is ‘cost-effective’ and reasonable, and will deliver net economic benefits for electric ratepayers and the Commonwealth. Opponents have thrown up every possible obstacle to Cape Wind’s progress and this obstruction has had delayed the day when residents of the Commonwealth can reap considerable economic and environmental benefits of the project. The public’s patience is, appropriately, wearing thin. These stall tactics are draining public resources while keeping Massachusetts from benefiting from the clean energy and green jobs that Cape Wind will provide.”

Conservation Law Foundation, represented by CLF Massachusetts Director Susan Reid, intervened with the Union of Concerned Scientists, the Natural Resources Defense Council and Clean Power Now in the case of the Alliance to Protect Nantucket Sound vs. The Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities, filing a full brief in the case in July.

Background on Cape Wind

Cape Wind has strong public support and demonstrated economic and environmental benefits, and has undergone exhaustive scientific review clearing the project of significant impacts to ocean habitats and wildlife.  The project has secured a composite permit consisting of all necessary state and local permits, which was affirmed by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.  In October 2010, following more than nine years of federal environmental and permitting reviews, Cape Wind also signed the nation’s first federal lease for offshore wind energy.

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