Clean Water

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Exeter Forges Ahead on the Fertilizer Front
by Jeff Barnum

The Healthy Lawns-Clean Water committee in Exeter, NH, is forging ahead with new fertilizer restrictions in the town. Established by the Town and funded by a grant from the Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership (PREP), interested folks – myself included – have convened numerous times to give serious thought to how to reduce nitrogen discharge in…

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If Done Right, New Agriculture Standards Could Improve Vermont’s Water Quality
by Rebekah Weber

The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets is revising Vermont’s agricultural standards. The new Required Agricultural Practices (RAPs) represent an important opportunity to transition to a sustainable agricultural system that improves water quality. Fostering environmentally sensitive practices is important because many lakes and rivers across the state are polluted, in part, due to agricultural…

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Protecting New England Together
by Veronica Eady

One of the most rewarding parts of my job as a CLF advocate is getting out into communities to meet with the people directly impacted by our work. Sometimes, we meet at the office of a local grassroots organization. Other times, I find myself huddled around a kitchen table with a concerned group of neighbors.…

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New Hampshire Oil Spill Practice Deployment
by Jeff Barnum

What happens if there is an oil spill at a power plant or distributor on the Piscataqua River in Portsmouth or Newington, New Hampshire? If the first responders at these facilities fail to immediately control the spill, who responds as that oil moves upriver and into Little Bay and Great Bay? Enter the New Hampshire…

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See for Yourself How Polluted Stormwater Reaches Mashapaug Pond
by Max Greene

It’s raining in Providence right now. And that means water is running across the city’s rooftops, roads, and parking lots, picking up pollutants like oil and animal waste, and depositing them into water bodies like Mashapaug Pond. The term for this polluted rainwater is stormwater runoff, and it’s one of the reasons Mashapaug Pond has…

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Video: Nitrogen Reductions Around Great Bay
by Jeff Barnum

A weight of evidence has made clear that excessive nitrogen is detrimental to the health of Great Bay, with vast acreages of eelgrass – the cornerstone of the ecosystem – having disappeared. In fact, it would be highly unlikely to find any eelgrass at all from New Castle all the way upriver and to Adams…

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Can Cows, Manure, and Algae All Add Up to Clean Water? Lessons from Charlotte, Vermont
by Carolyn Dube

Innovation continues to thrive in the Green Mountain State. The Nordic Farm is looking at using algae to turn manure and other biological waste into fuel and fertilizer. The farm’s dairy barn is home to 300 cows. These ladies produce more than a ton of manure every day. That’s a lot of waste. Seventeen dairy…

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Another Significant Step Toward a Clean and Healthy Lake Champlain
by Rebekah Weber

Last week, CLF and the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets (AAFM) agreed to an historic settlement that provides the blueprint for farmers to reach Vermont’s goal of clean and healthy waters across the state. This agreement comes nearly a year after AAFM originally rejected CLF’s petition for stricter standards for agricultural operations. However, the context…

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Great Bay is Cleaner Today
by Jeff Barnum

On August 13th, Seven Rivers Paddling of Newmarket and Timberland of Stratham teamed up with Jeff Barnum, CLF’s Great Bay–Piscataqua Waterkeeper, to patrol several areas of the estuary, picking up whatever refuse they could find. “Great Bay is an estuary of national significance – one of only 28 in the U.S. – and deserves our…