Big Gas

Blog
New England Needs to Move On from Dirty Gas
by Sandy Levine

Getting serious about climate change means getting serious about our gas use. It means all of us working together to build a clean energy future that doesn’t require the expensive and polluting buildout of more fracked gas. We don’t need it. And we can’t afford it.

Snowball
How to Kill a Power Plant

In 2015, energy giant Invenergy announced its plan to pave over a pristine forest in Burrillville, Rhode Island, to build a 1,000-megawatt fracked gas and diesel oil power plant. For the next four years, CLF and the town of Burrillville fought to keep the polluting behemoth from being built.

Snowball
Turn off the Gas

Winter snow and ice bring out Big Gas’s fearmongers. Why is the region’s electric grid operator among them?

Blog
Dirty, Fracked Gas Is a Dead End for New England
by Sandy Levine

Fracked gas was once considered part of a lower-carbon future. But this volatile, dangerous, and polluting fossil fuel now needs to be shown the door. Thankfully, as New England’s growing investment in cleaner energy ramps up, this transition is becoming easier. But standing in its way are the last gasps of the dirty fossil fuel industry. And they are not going quietly.

Blog
Rhode Island Rejects Invenergy
by Jerry Elmer

Today, Invenergy was denied a permit to pave over a pristine forest in Burrillville to build a fracked gas and diesel oil power plant that would emit carbon pollution for decades. This is a victory for CLF, for the people of Burrillville, and for a world facing a climate emergency.

Blog
Invenergy Final Hearing Resumes
by Jerry Elmer

After a month-long hiatus, the Invenergy Final Hearing has resumed. At stake is whether Rhode Island’s Energy Facility Siting Board will grant Invenergy a permit to pave over a forest in Burrillville to build a new fracked gas and diesel oil power plant.

Blog
Why We Don’t Need to Worry About Cold Snaps in New England
by Bethany Kwoka

It’s hardly news that temperatures in New England drop below freezing in winter. But as CLF has long argued, we have plenty of fuel to get through even the coldest winters unscathed, without footing the bill for a polluting new pipeline. And on top of that, if we want to avoid the most devastating effects of climate change, we must stop using dirty fuels like gas altogether.