It’s Time for New England to Ditch Fracked Gas

Our region relies too much on this dangerous fossil fuel

Bethany Kwoka | @bkwoka

Ever winter, as the cold rolls in and New Englanders turn up their heat, the gas industry starts calling for more pipelines. They claim we need more gas to power our homes and businesses through the winter—even though we know that is not true.

What they aren’t saying is that we already rely too much on fracked gas, and that this dirty fossil fuel contributes to climate change. If we want to avoid a climate catastrophe, we need to end fossil fuel use—including our addiction to fracked gas—by 2050 at the very latest.

Big Gas and its allies have spent millions greenwashing this fuel. They’ve tried to make us think that it isn’t harming our health and our planet. They’ve tried to convince us that without it we won’t be able to keep our lights on during the coldest months.

But they don’t have our interests at heart. What they want is more profits. They want to build more massive pipelines and line their investors’ pockets at our expense. Because it’s all of us who will be stuck paying for these pipelines, even when our region has moved on to clean, renewable sources of energy.

So why don’t we skip ahead to that clean energy future instead? New England is already growing its wind and solar industries, and, with a little more work, they can overtake gas. With a combination of smart policies, good business incentives, and strong planning, clean energy can dominate New England. But to get there, we need everyone to put pressure on businesses and lawmakers to say no to Big Gas.

Together we can ditch fracked gas and make New England a region that thrives on clean energy.

Watch and share the video above to learn how you can help New England ditch fracked gas and create a future built on clean, safe energy. You can also sign our pledge to stand with CLF in saying NO to Big Gas.

Because if we act today, we can thrive tomorrow.

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