Environmental Justice

Blog
New England Won Against Transdev – Here’s What Happens Next
by Naomi Richmond

In our latest case to stop toxic tailpipe pollution, we sued Transdev Services, Inc., under the federal Clean Air Act. Transdev is a leading provider of transportation throughout the country, including Boston’s public school buses. CLF is holding Transdev accountable by requiring them to fund projects at three local nonprofit organizations: Speak for the Trees, HEET (the Home Energy Efficiency Team), and Alternatives for Community & Environment (ACE).

Blog
Building Communities That Thrive: A Conversation with Dr. Thea James

It’s tempting to boil down good health solely to factors like medical care, healthy food, and exercise. However, many other dynamics, like historic redlining and racial segregation, along with substandard housing, air pollution, crumbling infrastructure, and lack of access to jobs, healthy food, and green space, all play a role. Perhaps no one understands the interplay of these factors better than those who work in healthcare, including Dr. Thea James, who serves as Boston Medical Center’s Associate Chief Medical Officer, Vice President of Mission, and Director of the Violence Prevention.

Blog
Rebuilding a Resilient Vermont
by Jen Duggan

COVID-19 has had a profound impact on Vermonters. But, if we move forward in the right way, we can build a resilient future for Vermont. Here are the three priority areas that we must work on to create the future we want.

Press Releases
Agreement to Cut Transportation Emissions Finalized

“TCI has the potential to fill a glaring gap in transportation funding and to reduce emissions, but it has been fraught by a process that too often ignored community concerns,” said CLF President Bradley Campbell. “While today’s agreement includes important equity commitments, it is the next steps that matter most. CLF can only support this program if these commitments become enforceable policies and truly additive investments in climate and the communities suffering most from air pollution and lack of transportation options.”

Blog
A Wave of Good News for the People of Great Bay
by Melissa Paly

From multimillion-dollar investments to win-win collaborations, good news from New Hampshire’s Great Bay give us reasons to celebrate in 2020. Taken together, these stories remind us that when communities act boldly, we can turn the tide on pollution and restore the health of the rivers, bays, and coast in the Seacoast region and beyond.

Blog
Got Thanksgiving Leftovers? Here’s What to Do with Them This Year
by Kirstie Pecci

In true 2020 fashion, many families are having small-scale get-togethers or opting for virtual celebrations this Thanksgiving. With less people, that means being even more careful not to overbuy and waste food – because food waste can be terribly damaging to the environment. So let’s think about this for a second – what can you do to waste less food this Thanksgiving?

Blog
How to Move Beyond Environmental Justice as a Trend
by Naomi Richmond

I grew up in communities that needed environmental justice the most. I also lived in neighborhoods that already had the resources and ability to make change. Still, I didn’t understand the difference or know what the environmental world called the movement until later in life. I could only connect the dots when I had more access to education and a framework for understanding the issue.

Blog
Biden Win Sets the Stage for a Greener Future, But Local Action Is Still Vital
by Bradley Campbell

The presidential election result is a welcome relief – especially amid the ongoing stresses of an unrelenting pandemic, hobbling economic hardship, and an overdue racial reckoning. We all deserve to take a moment and celebrate that. But even as we see the core values of our democracy vindicated after relentless voter suppression efforts, now is not the time to grow complacent.

Blog
UPDATE: What Would Massachusetts’s Environmental Justice Laws Accomplish?
by Amy Laura Cahn

Low-income, immigrant, and communities of color experience more environmental burdens than whiter, wealthier neighborhoods. Having strong environmental justice legislation would make a significant difference in these neighborhoods, in part by simply ensuring residents have a voice in what happens in their own communities.