News Clips Steph Solis, MassLive
Encore Boston Harbor, bus operators could face penalties over ‘excessive idling’

“We already know that this know that this kind of pollution is terrible for our upper respiratory system for things like asthma and lung disease,” said Alyssa Rayman-Read, vice president and director of CLF Massachusetts. “Encore and all these different companies have a responsibility to the communities that they’re in not to exacerbate existing public health crises.”

Blog
New Hampshire Joins the Fight Against Plastic Pollution
by Melissa Paly

What do polystyrene foam containers, paper coffee cups, and plastic grocery bags, food ware, and straws all have in common? None of them are recyclable and they cost towns and cities an enormous amount of money. What’s more, heaps of these single-use items end up on our beaches and shores, serving as an ugly reminder…

Blog
A Massachusetts Casino Is Making Air Pollution Worse
by Chelsea Kendall

Since the Encore Boston Harbor casino opened its doors in June, residents of Everett, Chelsea, and Malden have been subjected to toxic tailpipe pollution from Encore’s branded vehicles, which consistently idle for more than 20-minute stretches near schools, parks, and homes. CLF has announced our intent to sue Encore and the companies operating its shuttle buses for their illegal idling, continuing our ongoing fight for cleaner air in our communities.

Press Releases
Encore Casino Shuttles Polluting Nearby Neighborhoods

“The casino is a brand-new neighbor, and it’s already wearing out its welcome,” said Alyssa Rayman-Read, Vice President and Director of CLF Massachusetts. “There’s no excuse for shuttle buses sitting in already-vulnerable neighborhoods pumping toxic fumes into the air. These companies must prove that they care about the health of their neighbors and put an end to this dangerous, unlawful idling immediately.”

News Clips David Abel, The Boston Globe
Excessive idling by Encore Boston Harbor shuttles sparks lawsuit threat

“The casino is a brand-new neighbor, and it’s already wearing out its welcome,” said Alyssa Rayman-Read, director of CLF Massachusetts. “There’s no excuse for shuttle buses sitting in already vulnerable neighborhoods pumping toxic fumes into the air.”

Blog
Maine Makes Plan to Manage Polluted Stormwater Runoff
by Sean Mahoney

Polluted runoff is harming our lakes, rivers, streams, and ocean. To solve the stormwater pollution problem, we must address its largest source: the storm sewers of our cities and towns. Maine’s Department of Environmental Protection is proposing a new permit program that will not only limit and control the volume of pollution flowing from the storm sewers in our communities but also require cities and towns to devise plans to prevent that pollution in the first place.

News Clips Laurie Schreiber, Mainebiz
At Legal Food Hub, attorneys help food businesses, pro bono

“We saw a trend and a growing need in the farming and food entrepreneur community for affordable legal services,” says Phelps Turner, a staff attorney who manages the Maine hub. “So we leveraged our connections in the legal community throughout New England to create this program. We identified attorneys and law firms willing to volunteer their time and provide free legal services to farmers and food entrepreneurs.”

Blog
Five Questions with Zack Porter
by Ashira Morris

As Lake Champlain Lakekeeper, Zack Porter works on the ground with communities, at the state house with legislators, and hand in hand with partners to restore Vermont’s iconic waterbody to health.

News Clips Alex Kuffner, Providence Journal
R.I. may enact more stringent drinking water standards

Amy Moses, Rhode Island director of the Conservation Law Foundation, said that at a minimum any regulations in the state must have an enforceable drinking water standard at the lowest possible level for some of the most common PFAS chemicals. But she said it’s not enough to target only a few of the compounds when there are thousands of slightly different variations in the PFAS family.

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