landfill

Conservation Matters Articles
Talking Trash
by Laurie O'Reilly

CLF Launches Zero-Waste Project to Tackle Massachusetts’s Trash Problem On a Monday night in February, more than 100 people crowded into the Sturbridge, Massachusetts, town hall for an emergency meeting of the town’s Board of Health. Nineteen wells in the Sturbridge neighborhood closest to the massive Southbridge Landfill had just tested high for lead –…

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Massachusetts Ignores Public Concerns and Climate Change in Controversial Landfill Decision
by Veronica Eady

Yesterday, Massachusetts Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Matthew Beaton decided not to require an environmental impact review for the Wheelabrator ash landfill in Saugus. The decades-old landfill sits next to a municipal solid waste incinerator on the Saugus and Pine Rivers and Bear Creek, located in a legally protected “area of critical environmental concern,”…

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Explaining The Central Landfill: Why it Matters
by Taylor Hay

Central Landfill has been allowed to pollute our local air for so long that it’s simply become the norm for too many of the people living in its shadow. The gases the landfill emits are not only bad for the physical health of its immediate neighbors, however. On a broad scale, fugitive emissions like the kind generated by the landfill contribute to global warming, which means they have real and lasting effects for people everywhere.

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As Plain as the Nose on Your Face: Major Clean Air Act Violations at Rhode Island’s Central Landfill
by Max Greene

For miles around Rhode Island’s Central Landfill, the air often smells like rotten eggs.  In the Landfill, garbage degrades and gives off a gas that is part hydrogen sulfide (which produces the rotten-egg smell), part volatile organic compounds (which can cause cancer), and part methane (a potent greenhouse gas).  At well-run landfills, collection systems capture…

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Single-Stream Recycling for Rhode Island: Let’s make it work
by Kim Twist

Recently, Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation attempted to make recycling easier for Rhode Islanders by creating “single-stream recycling.” Now households do not have to separate paper from plastic – everything can go in the same bin and other items can also now be recycled, such as plastic cups, tissue paper and just about any plastic container 2 gallons or less in volume. Sounds simple and great, right? Sadly, it hasn’t caught on yet.