Voyage to the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument

Take a deep dive to the depths of New England's very own marine national monument


New England is home to the only marine national monument in the Atlantic, the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts. Designated by President Obama in 2016, the monument provides refuge to an abundance of species, both rare and common. Recently, the Biden administration affirmed that the Canyons and Seamounts deserved protected permanently.  

Our comic brings to the surface a glimpse of monument’s beauty and diversity. This piece drew inspiration from NOAA’s ocean expeditions and the images captured in these dives. But the featured species represent just a small fraction of the myriad of creatures found in this place. 

Join us as we take a deep dive into the depths of this ocean treasure:

130 Miles of New England's coast, a magical place teems with vibrant and colorful life... the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Seabirds soar above, ready to dive for their next meal. And right whales, swordfish, and other creatures swim just below the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Currents of deep, cold water bring up nutrients from the monument‛s depths, feeding plankton, squid, herring, and other fish. But there‛s more to this amazing place than what meets the eye... Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument The monument provides a refuge for species - both common and rare. That‛s why it‛s so critical that it is protected from human activities. Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument The monument has three canyons: Oceanographer, Gilber, and Lydonia. The canyons‛ hard walls make the perfect home for sponges, corals, anemones, and more... Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Can you believe Bear Seamount rises  9,800 feet above the seafloor? Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument The deeper we go,  the more otherworldly the creatures that  live here become. Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Seatoads, bloody belly jellies, and sea spiders look like they belong in a  sci-fi movie. Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Scientists have discovered more than 60 unique species of coral. Some – like bamboo and thorn  corals - are 4,000 years old and counting! Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument Because these waters are relatively undisturbed by humans, they serve as living laboratories for scientists. And having protected places like this in our ocean helps to build resilience to the worst impacts of climate change. Designating the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts as a Marine National Monument was a a great first step... But, we need to protect more of our ocean  here in New England, around the U.S., and   worlwide - that‛s why scientists are urging  us to protect 30% of the ocean by 2030. We have the power to protect more of our ocean. Together, we can rise to the challenge and ensure a healthy ocean for generations to come.

*The illustrations in this comic provide solely a visual representation of the creatures and seascape found in the monument. The dimensions of the species and the distance between geological formations are not drawn to scale. 

Learn more about our work to protect the ocean

Even before the designation of Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, CLF advocated for protecting special places in our ocean. We will continue fighting to keep this and other important ocean areas safe. Learn more about work to protect more of the ocean here in New England and across U.S. waters.

Before you go… CLF is working every day to create real, systemic change for New England’s environment. And we can’t solve these big problems without people like you. Will you be a part of this movement by considering a contribution today? If everyone reading our blog gave just $10, we’d have enough money to fund our legal teams for the next year.

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Oceans

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