Clean Energy & Climate Change

Blog
Vermonters: Speak Up on Climate Action!
by Sandy Levine

The devastation left by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma shows that bold action is needed now — and needed everywhere — to cut climate-damaging emissions. We can build stronger communities by hastening our transformation to cleaner, renewable energy. Renewable energy not only reduces harmful greenhouse gas emissions, but also provides good local jobs. This summer, Vermont’s…

Blog
Connecticut’s Draft Energy Strategy Is Big on Dirty Gas, Short on Clean Energy

By Caitlin Peale Sloan and Max Greene In July, Governor Malloy released a long-awaited Comprehensive Energy Strategy for Connecticut. While it shows Connecticut’s interest in cutting carbon pollution, this strategy will not help the state reach its clean energy goals. Instead, it would further Connecticut’s reliance on dirty gas and destructive gas pipelines. What the…

Blog
Carbon Pricing 101
by Samuel Niiro

With the Trump administration in denial about climate change, let alone the need for urgent climate action, it’s up to the states to take the lead on curbing carbon pollution. Here in New England, such leadership is nothing new. Massachusetts passed first-of-its-kind legislation to limit emissions back in 2008 and all six New England states…

Conservation Matters Articles
Fighting Big Gas
by Bethany Kwoka

Jason and Erin Olkowski never saw themselves as activists and community organizers. But that all changed when Invenergy came to their small Rhode Island town, with its plans to build a massive new natural gas plant next door to family homes and within a pristine conservation area.

Blog
Full Speed Ahead for Offshore Wind in New England
by Megan Herzog

Today marks an incredible milestone for Massachusetts, and a monumental step forward toward a clean energy economy in New England. Massachusetts’ three biggest electric companies issued a ground-breaking request for bids for offshore wind energy. Wind developers will now compete to sell Massachusetts residents at least 400 megawatts (and up to a whopping 800 megawatts)…