kayaking

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Vermont Recommits to the Clean Water Act
by Anthony Iarrapino

Yesterday, EPA sent Vermont’s clean water agency, the Department of Environmental Conservation, a Clean Water Act “Corrective Action Plan,” outlining permitting and enforcement improvements and updates the state has made or needs to make to ensure that the state provides all the protections required by law to its citizens and the waters they have a right…

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Bellamy River – A Hidden Gem In the Great Bay Estuary
by Peter Wellenberger

There are seven rivers that drain into the Great Bay estuary, carrying freshwater runoff – as well as pollutants – from 52 communities including 10 in Maine. The Bellamy River, which flows into Little Bay, originates from Swains Lake in Barrington and flows east through the Bellamy Reservoir in Madbury and then through the City…

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This Summer Discover the Wonders of Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

The Great Bay estuary – often referred to as New Hampshire’s hidden coast – offers many opportunities for recreational and nature enthusiasts.  The subtle beauty of Great Bay is captivating, especially in early morning when the estuary is filled with the sounds of wildlife. So whether you enjoy kayaking, hiking, fishing, birding or nature photography,…

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Rustic Rivers Flattened
by Alan Panebaker

It had been more than a month since Tropical Storm Irene when I returned to kayak my favorite whitewater rivers in Vermont: the Middlebury and the New Haven. The massive flows from Irene moved some small rocks around, but in most places the overall character of the these rustic rivers remained the same, even after the storm. Sadly that is not true about sections of the rivers near roads where in the name of “repair” bulldozers literally flattened the rivers, excavating giant boulders, dredging gravel, and leaving the once vibrant river an unrecognizable shell. Rapids that used to be complex, multi-tiered stretches, supporting important habitat had transformed into homogeneous flat spots.