T Archives - Conservation Law Foundation

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Federal Complaint Filed Over Eliminated MBTA Late-Night Service

… The complaint filed Tuesday by the vice president at the Conservation Law Foundation claims the MBTA didn’t properly measure the impact on low-income and minority riders before ending its service in March. The T’s fiscal control board voted in February to end late-night service, saying it wasn’t “cost-effective.” Rafael Mares, an attorney at the Conservation Law Foundation,…

News Clips
Get Ready To Pay More To Ride The T

… “If you increase the fares without improving the service, you’ll get fewer people using it,” said Rafael Mares, a senior vice president at the Conservation Law Foundation. Read more here…

Blog
Feeling crowded on the MBTA? It’s not just you.
by Emily Long

“Watch the doors. Doors are closing. There is more service immediately behind this train. Please wait for the next train. Doors are closing.”

I find I am hearing this message more and more on the MBTA. So when the transit agency announced yesterday that average weekday ridership topped 400 million trips in FY2012, setting a new record, I was not the least bit surprised.

Blog
Response to OpEd: The Real Fast Track to Trouble
by Rafael Mares

Rafael Mares, staff attorney at Conservation Law Foundation, authored the following letter to the editor of the Boston Herald in response to Charles Chieppo’s op-ed on July 3, entitled “Fast Track to Trouble“. In his op-ed, Charles Chieppo accurately states that the “T is a cornerstone of the regional economy and a lifeline for countless people.” (Fast…

Blog
MBTA Approves Scenario 3: Now Legislature Must Do the Right Thing
by Rafael Mares

The MBTA voted today to approve “Scenario 3,” the proposal put forth last week to close the $159 million budget gap the T is facing this fiscal year. The plan is a lot better than the draconian fare increases and drastic service cuts that it initially proposed and we commend the MBTA for listening to the public and all stakeholders’ concerns to get to a 23% increase with minimal service cuts that is within the range of reasonableness, given the T’s desperate financial straits.

Blog
Even the Red Line is a green line
by Rafael Mares

In his column in yesterday’s Boston Globe, Harvard economics professor Edward Glaeser illustrates that densely developed cities are better for the environment than leafy suburbs.