Erica Fuller

Senior Attorney CLF Massachusetts

Erica Fuller is a Senior Attorney in our Oceans program. Erica joins CLF after eight years at Earthjustice, where her work focused on protecting ocean ecosystems and rebuilding depleted forage and groundfish populations.

Erica holds a J.D from the University of Maine and a B.A. in Forestry and a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Georgia. Prior to attending law school, Erica owned and operated an equine veterinary practice in the Metrowest Boston Area for 20 years. During law school she earned the Outstanding Scholastic Achievement Award in Environmental Law and was recognized for her pro bono work for the Conservation Law Foundation as the principal author of the petition to list the Atlantic wolffish under the Endangered Species Act.

Erica lives in Ipswich, Massachusetts with her husband and three children and serves on the Board of Directors for the Ipswich River Watershed Association.


Recent Posts

A Victory for North Atlantic Right Whales
In a major win for endangered North Atlantic right whales, a federal judge ruled that gillnet fishing gear must be removed from 3,000 nautical miles of ocean waters in southern New England. CLF sued the federal government last year for opening up two areas south and east of Nantucket to expanded fishing without considering harm…
Update: Ensuring a Future for Atlantic Herring
UPDATE: Our regional fishery managers at the New England Fishery Management Council signed off on Amendment 8. Now, we’re just steps away from managing herring better: this important update will establish a new approach for setting catch limits that accounts for herring’s role in the ecosystem and create a buffer zone that prevents large boats…
The Road to Ropeless Fishing Gear
Off the rocky coastline of Maine is an expanse of brightly colored lobster buoys. The buoys – which mark where potentially millions of traps are dropped along the 3,000-mile coast – are an iconic image, bobbing along with the shifting tides. But lobsters aren’t the only living icon in Maine’s waters: The North Atlantic right…
Threats Continue as Right Whales Migrate Back to New England
North Atlantic right whales have been described as “urban whales.” They got this name in part because every year, pregnant females, and other members of the population, journey from the Northeast through industrialized waters to coastal areas of off Florida and Georgia to calve. Then they turn around and come back north with their young…
North Atlantic Right Whales are at the End of Their Rope. Protections Can’t Wait.
Until last month, we thought that there were around 450 North Atlantic right whales. They were already one of the most endangered whales in the world. At the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium meeting in New Bedford last month, scientists announced that even this small population estimate was too high. With a new estimate of…

 

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