Boston Harbor 2.0

Blog
Let’s Learn from the Seaport’s Mistakes, Not Repeat Them
by Deanna Moran

Boston’s newest neighborhood, the Seaport District, has drawn recent criticism for its high-priced housing and amenities, exclusivity, and lack of diversity. What started out as an incredibly rare chance for Boston to redevelop nearly 1,000 acres of city land is now largely considered a major missed opportunity. Given the billions of dollars of public investment…

Press Releases
Massachusetts Gives Huge Handout of Public Land to Private Developer

“This is quite possibly the worst decision ever made on who has access to our public tidelands and waterfront,” said CLF senior counsel Peter Shelley. “And it now sets a precedent for even worse privatization of public tidelands in the future.  It comes at a time when the public is justifiably upset that wealthy developers and luxury condominiums are walling off Boston Harbor from the people who paid to clean it up and make it attractive in the first place — the people of Massachusetts.”

Blog
One Year Down: Fighting Back and Fighting On for New England
by Sean Mahoney

We’re not giving in. Yes, approaching a year after President’s Trump’s election, he seems intent on undermining decades of work to protect public health and the environment and fostering an ideology that denies and denigrates the basic facts of science. But we’ve been here before. In the 1970s, oil companies were intent on drilling for…

Blog
Pitch-a-Blanket Day: The Story Behind the #PeoplesHarbor
by Amanda Yanchury

The conversation around public access and rampant development along the Boston Harbor is heating up. But some waterfront properties seem a little confused about the rules for public access – for existing establishments and for the many new projects popping up. Here’s why this matters: Much of the land in the Seaport District is subject…

Blog
Boston: When Public Spaces Aren’t Really Public
by Deanna Moran

This week, the City of Boston proclaimed its dedication to working with developers to create public spaces in the midst of its new construction boom – and ensuring that those spaces are kept public and welcoming. The next day, the Intercontinental Hotel at 500 Atlantic Avenue received a notice from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental…

News Clips
It’s a cleaner harbor, with fewer spots to enjoy it

We are at the dawn of another summertime in the city, and along Boston’s sparkling waterfront, ferries dodge porpoises and sleek boats glide through sparkling water and head for moorings in a harbor that once was — quite literally — an open sewer. If he closes his eyes, Peter Shelley can easily conjure up those…

Conservation Matters Articles
Boston Harbor 2.0
by Laurie O'Reilly

The New Frontier in the Fight to Save Boston Harbor When CLF launched its 1983 lawsuit against the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for dumping toxic sludge and untreated wastewater into Boston Harbor, years of neglect by the federal government, the state, the city, and polluters had turned the harbor into a shameful liability. But over time,…

News Clips
Environmental group files suit to stop Seaport condo tower

The Conservation Law Foundation, which has fiercely opposed the development, made good on its threat to sue the state to stop developer Jon Cronin’s $260 million project if it received approval from state environmental regulators. The project, proposed on the site of Cronin’s Whiskey Priest and Atlantic Beer Garden restaurants, got the green light from…

Press Releases
CLF Takes Defense of Boston Waterfront to Court

“The Boston waterfront is a public treasure, an engine of tourism and a hub of economic growth, but it all collapses when we neglect our communal right to this resource,” said CLF senior counsel Peter Shelley. “The public has invested well over fifteen billion dollars in the harbor cleanup and waterfront improvements and has a protected privilege to enjoy the benefits of these investments. By approving a luxury residential scheme that essentially privatizes a public resource, the Baker Administration is corrupting a longstanding process designed to protect public interest. The minute we prioritize individual development goals over the public good, we start down a slippery slope that could spell disaster for our communities and our harbor.”