Lake Champlain Lakekeeper

Blog
The Year Ahead at the Vermont State House
by Jen Duggan

With the Vermont General Assembly reconvening, CLF is working with lawmakers to advance solutions that protect our natural resources, build healthy communities, and sustain a vibrant economy on behalf of all Vermonters. This session, we’re focusing on cutting carbon, limiting plastic pollution, protecting the state from toxic “forever chemicals,” defending water quality, and more.

Press Releases
Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets’ Emergency Exemption Inconsistent with Clean Water Laws

“An increase in rain and snow is not an emergency,” said Jen Duggan Vice President and Director of CLF Vermont. “Vermont is a wet state and it is getting wetter as a result of climate change. The State should be focused on real solutions instead of relying on blanket waivers that are inconsistent with clean water laws and result in polluted waterways.”

News Clips
Advocates oppose state allowing farmers to spread manure on snow

Jen Duggan, director of CLF Vermont, said in an interview that the ban should remain due to the “greater risk” of manure spread on snow running off into water. The Vermont Attorney General’s Office is looking into possible stream pollution by a Highgate dairy farm based on an Agency of Agriculture enforcement staff video of manure-laden water flowing off a field into a nearby ditch.

Blog
It’s Time to Stop Draining the Swamp
by Zack Porter

Some Vermont lawmakers seem hell-bent on eliminating the state’s few wetlands that have survived three centuries of filling and draining. And if they have their way, our remaining wetlands could be at risk at the upcoming state legislative session, starting in January. It’s time to gear up and raise your voice for the under-appreciated, yet critically important values of Vermont’s wetlands. 

Blog
Lake Champlain in Crisis: An Illustrated Narrative
by Jen Duggan

Summer after summer, Lake Champlain is plagued with toxic cyanobacteria blooms, also known as blue-green algae. These toxic algae outbreaks harm our way of life as well: the next generation of Vermonters may not be able to enjoy a summer on Lake Champlain the way that their grandparents did.

News Clips
Vermont Still Has No Plan to Pay for Clean Water

Weber said accountability and monitoring are particularly important because the job ahead is so huge. “We need to remove around 213 metric tons of phosphorus from Lake Champlain,” Weber said. “That’s just Lake Champlain. There are other obligations in other watersheds. We’re not near that goal.”