Across New England

Blog
Our Recycling System is Broken
by John Hite

Our recycling system is in a crisis. Up until last year, recyclables collected for the U.S. were shipped to China for processing. But then, China stopped accepting our recycling, setting off a chain reaction of problems. In New England and across the country, the cost of recycling for towns and cities is skyrocketing, forcing local…

Blog
Municipal Solid Waste: What is It and Why is It a Problem?
by Kirstie Pecci

Think for a moment about the trash you produce every day, either directly or indirectly. First, there’s what you throw out at your home or your job; then there’s the trash that restaurants, laundromats, doctors’ offices, and other businesses you frequent throw out after you leave. Next, add the waste from the farms that produce…

Press Releases
EPA Announces Weak Standards for Lead in Drinking Water

“It’s imperative that we end childhood lead poisoning in our lifetime,” said Amy Laura Cahn, Director of CLF’s Healthy Communities and Environmental Justice program. “Don’t be fooled into thinking that families will be protected by this proposed change. We need a health-based standard that recognizes the only safe level of lead for kids is zero. That – and removing lead pipes from our water infrastructure – must be the only goal for regulators.”

Blog
A North Atlantic Right Whale Family Tree
by Ashira Morris

This summer, 10 right whales died, including Wolverine, the great-grandson of famous right whale matriarch Kleenex. Each whale death this year means families lost mothers, fathers, siblings, and grandchildren — a family tree that’s losing branches. Calving mothers like Kleenex are crucial to the right whales’ survival.

Blog
Can You Slash Your Trash for One Week?
by Olivia Synoracki

We live surrounded by trash, especially single-use plastic. It’s in our homes, schools, restaurants, offices, communities, and the environment. There’s so much waste that it can be easy to miss its full scale in our lives. Manufacturers and brand owners have created this throw-away culture by mass-producing disposable goods. But when it comes time to…

Blog
The Ocean Has Saved Us. Now, It’s Our Turn to Save the Ocean.
by Priscilla Brooks

The world’s oceans are in dire straits. A startling UN report confirms what we at CLF have been saying for years: Without drastic measures to halt climate-damaging emissions and protect our oceans, life in New England, and around the world, will be forever changed. If we act now, we can still protect our oceans and way of life for future generations. But we don’t have a moment to waste.

News Clips
Federal agency accused of mispresenting views of its scientists in opening fishing grounds off Cape

“These troubling allegations suggest unlawful conduct at the highest levels of the agency and possibly among lawyers at the Department of Justice,” said Erica Fuller, a senior staff attorney at the Conservation Law Foundation. “The officials charged with protecting this species appear willing to misrepresent the facts and the science to both the court and the public, because they’re hell-bent on doing nothing that might save right whales from extinction.”

News Clips
Climate change is coming for our toilets. Here’s how we can stop it.

Roads, drinking water wells, landfills, and other infrastructure are susceptible to rising groundwater, too. “We actually have infrastructure that’s inland that we need to be thinking about as well in terms of reliability and functionality in the face of climate change,” said Elena Mihaly, staff attorney at Conservation Law Foundation.

Press Releases
States Release Transportation Climate Outline

“Transportation emissions are worsening the climate crisis, and it’s about time the region worked together on a solution,” said Amy Laura Cahn, Director of CLF’s Healthy Communities and Environmental Justice program. “Underserved communities have endured the majority of pollution and a lack of healthy transportation options for too long, and they must be the first to see the benefits from a clean transportation system. While today’s plan is a good first step, we need to be working on all fronts to reduce emissions and improve air quality.”