gas

Blog
Looking Back: One Year After the Newport Gas Outage
by Amy Moses

Exactly a year ago, as families prepared for a brutal winter night, National Grid cut gas service to more than 7,000 customers on Aquidneck Island. With another New England winter upon us, it’s also worth noting that Rhode Island could avoid these types of emergencies entirely by switching from fossil fuels like gas to clean alternatives powered by solar and wind.

Snowball
Turn off the Gas

Winter snow and ice bring out Big Gas’s fearmongers. Why is the region’s electric grid operator among them?

Blog
Dirty, Fracked Gas Is a Dead End for New England
by Sandy Levine

Fracked gas was once considered part of a lower-carbon future. But this volatile, dangerous, and polluting fossil fuel now needs to be shown the door. Thankfully, as New England’s growing investment in cleaner energy ramps up, this transition is becoming easier. But standing in its way are the last gasps of the dirty fossil fuel industry. And they are not going quietly.

Press Releases
Report on Aquidneck Island Gas Disaster Released

“Customers should absolutely not be straddled with higher bills because of the mistakes of utilities,” said Amy Moses, Vice President and Director of CLF Rhode Island. “But the report’s suggestion of reducing demand for gas simply doesn’t go far enough. We need to get off dirty fracked gas and focus on clean renewables, not expand infrastructure that only harms our air and destroys our climate.”

Blog
Merrimack Gas Explosions: A Tragic Byproduct of Natural Gas
by Alyssa Rayman-Read

UPDATE: It’s the one-year anniversary of the Merrimack Valley gas explosion, and communities are still recovering from the disaster. It’s a stark reminder that we need to prioritize the health and safety of our communities, which means getting off dirty gas. Our aging gas infrastructure is expensive, leaky, and dangerous. We have cleaner, safer alternatives like electric stoves and hot water heaters ready to go. It’s time to swap out polluting gas for clean energy that doesn’t run the risk of exploding.

Blog
Why We Don’t Need to Worry About Cold Snaps in New England
by Bethany Kwoka

It’s hardly news that temperatures in New England drop below freezing in winter. But as CLF has long argued, we have plenty of fuel to get through even the coldest winters unscathed, without footing the bill for a polluting new pipeline. And on top of that, if we want to avoid the most devastating effects of climate change, we must stop using dirty fuels like gas altogether.