Apr 16, 2021

Massachusetts Reverses Rollback to Critical Clean Energy Policy

“Dirty, industrial biomass pollutes our neighborhoods and has no place in our clean energy future,” said Kirstie Pecci, Interim Director of CLF’s Environmental Justice program. “Massachusetts residents deserve clean air and a livable future. The Commonwealth should not subsidize power plants or incinerators that will harm communities already bearing the brunt of local pollution and climate impacts.”

Dirty energy sources contribute to dangerous air pollution
Sep 22, 2020

What Is a Renewable Energy Certificate?

A Renewable Energy Certificate is a way to measure and track the production of clean energy. It’s how states and utilities track how much clean energy is being produced by renewable energy sources and which electrical utilities are buying that power.

Good solar policy is important for the success of clean energy.
Sep 21, 2020

What Is a Renewable Portfolio Standard?

A Renewable Portfolio Standard is a way for states to ensure their electric utilities – and by extension, the states themselves – are making progress on clean energy. The best policies heavily emphasize clean renewables like wind and solar.

A Renewable Portfolio Standard helps boost jobs in the clean energy industry
Oct 11, 2019

Is Massachusetts Opening the Door to Dirty Energy?

Biomass developers are pushing for state policy changes that would allow their plants to emit more air pollution, underreport their climate impacts, and take families’ and businesses’ money while harming the health of our communities. CLF is joining Springfield residents and other local groups in fighting back.

Dirty energy sources contribute to dangerous air pollution
Jul 10, 2019

Why Are We Here Again? Standing with Springfield Against Biomass

Springfield, alongside community and environmental organizations like CLF, has been fighting this proposed biomass plant for years. We set the fight aside in 2017 when Palmer Renewable Energy, the company behind the proposal, paused its plans for construction. But now the company is back, hoping that its efforts to weaken state policy will bring its proposal back to life.

Protesting the biomass plant in Springfield