Responsible Fisheries Management

Blog
Federal Fisheries Bill Undermines the Health of Our Oceans
by Peter Shelley

Right now, the United States has some of the best-managed fisheries in the world. But a bill that just passed the House of Representatives is putting that at risk. Many fishing communities in New England and across the country currently have the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) to thank for their economic health.…

Press Releases
U.S. House of Representatives Undermines Success of Fisheries Management

“This bill is a giant step backward for fisheries and fishing communities,” said Peter Shelley, Senior Counsel at CLF. “We need fishery management practices based on science and accountability, not the whims of politicians, and we applaud the representatives who voted against this bill. CLF will continue to fight for a national fisheries law with strong environmental protections that benefits our fisheries, fishing communities, and marine ecosystem.”

Press Releases
Department of Public Health Issues Fish Advisory for the Lower Mystic River Area

“Without clear information about what is safe to eat, people in the Lower Mystic River Watershed area are at risk,” said Alyssa Rayman-Read, vice president and director of CLF Massachusetts. “The advisory will ensure that people have the information needed to safely fish in the area. This kind of public-nonprofit collaboration should be a model for working on important environmental issues.”

Blog
Taking On Dams on Maine’s Royal River
by Sean Mahoney

The Royal River runs about 30 miles from its headwaters in New Gloucester, Maine, to its outlet in Casco Bay in Yarmouth. Like many of New England’s coastal rivers, the Royal drove vital economic growth during the region’s industrial era, when dams built along its route harnessed water to power mills, tanneries, and more. While…

Blog
CLF Continues Working to Restore Native River Herring to New England’s Coastal Rivers
by Emily Green

Every year, alewives and blueback herring return to their native waters to spawn. But thousands of dams have cut these fish off from thousands of acres of freshwater bodies, thwarting reproductive cycles that had been ongoing for eons. The impact of these dams, on top of threats from pollution and overfishing, have led to a drastic decline in river herring populations –  threatening their survival.

Blog
Fisheries Managers Fail to Protect Our Ocean (Again)
by Peter Shelley

After 14 years of development, a newly approved plan for managing New England’s fisheries should have prioritized protection of important ocean habitats and improved the long-term well-being of our fishing economy. Instead, in a short-sighted decision, fishery managers put fragile habitats and overfished species at even greater risk than they are today.