Exeter

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The Great Dam Is History
by Jeff Barnum

New Hampshire is not a huge state. But, it is home to almost 5,000 dams – some active, some in disrepair, and some abandoned. That large number can now be reduced by one. The Great Dam in Exeter is no more. Great Bay is fed by seven freshwater rivers – and now two are without head-of-tide dams. In 1638,…

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Great Bay–Piscataqua Waterkeeper Vessel Launched for 2016!
by Jeff Barnum

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper vessel is back on the water for its third season.  Following our launch earlier this month, the weather did not cooperate until last week. Interest is keen from folks who want to climb aboard and explore Great Bay and the Piscataqua River to identify and discuss the challenges facing our local…

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Kudos to Exeter – A Victory for Clean Water
by Jeff Barnum

This week’s vote in Exeter, New Hampshire, was a pivotal one for the health of the Great Bay estuary, showing once again how much Seacoast residents care about clean water. At stake was the funding for a new sewage treatment facility and the adoption of nitrogen fertilizer regulations. Exeter residents stepped up in a big…

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Local Engagement, Local Waters
by Jeff Barnum

As Great Bay–Piscataqua Waterkeeper, I consider local public engagement to be key to restoring the health of the Great Bay estuary, and it’s a major part of my work. But even for those already aware of the value of our local waters and the challenges of achieving clean water, getting engaged often is not easy. People…

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Getting Out on Great Bay Estuary
by Jeff Barnum

Our Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper program has made terrific progress in protecting our amazing Great Bay estuary, and we’re making real progress toward our immediate goal of acquiring and launching a Waterkeeper vessel! If you haven’t already heard, we’re in the midst of a campaign to raise $25,000 by June 1, to enable us to purchase,…

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Progress for Great Bay: Exeter Agrees to Major Pollution Reductions
by Peter Wellenberger

Algae Growth in the Winnicut River, Greenland, NH; photo by Peter W. In early January, the Town of Exeter’s Selectmen voted 5 to 0 not to appeal a permit issued by the EPA – a permit that will require a major upgrade of its sewage treatment plant. Exeter becomes the second Great Bay community to…

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A Campaign of Delay – Jeopardizing the Health of Great Bay
by Peter Wellenberger

Officials from Portsmouth, Dover and Rochester – in their continuing campaign to delay critically important pollution reductions in the Great Bay estuary – have put the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on notice that they intend to file suit over the nitrogen discharge levels being proposed in their wastewater treatment permits. As part of this campaign…

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OpEd: Save Great Bay Before It’s Too Late
by Peter Wellenberger

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper, along with the Coastal Conservation Association of NH, Great Bay Trout Unlimited and the NH Coastal Protection Partnership, coauthored the following editorial to The Portsmouth Herald. A copy of this OpEd was originally published in The Portsmouth Herald. You can find a copy of it online here. April 13 — To…

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Join CLF at a Free Screening of The Last Mountain in Exeter, NH on May 4th
by Christophe Courchesne

A keystone to CLF’s work to secure a clean energy future for the region is completing the transition to a coal-free New England. It is a time of historic progress: cleaner, cheaper alternatives are driving coal out of the market, and old coal plants are closing their doors. But New Hampshire remains a critical battleground…

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Growing the Right Way on the Seacoast
by Peter Wellenberger

We often hear that increasing the amount of impervious cover – surfaces such as roadways and parking lots – leads to more stormwater runoff and declining water quality. So how does a community grow and avoid adding new pollution sources? One key strategy is directing new, appropriate development into existing town centers and downtowns. The…