Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper

Blog
Video: Nitrogen Reductions Around Great Bay
by Jeff Barnum

A weight of evidence has made clear that excessive nitrogen is detrimental to the health of Great Bay, with vast acreages of eelgrass – the cornerstone of the ecosystem – having disappeared. In fact, it would be highly unlikely to find any eelgrass at all from New Castle all the way upriver and to Adams…

Blog
Great Bay is Cleaner Today
by Jeff Barnum

On August 13th, Seven Rivers Paddling of Newmarket and Timberland of Stratham teamed up with Jeff Barnum, CLF’s Great Bay–Piscataqua Waterkeeper, to patrol several areas of the estuary, picking up whatever refuse they could find. “Great Bay is an estuary of national significance – one of only 28 in the U.S. – and deserves our…

Blog
Local Engagement, Local Waters
by Jeff Barnum

As Great Bay–Piscataqua Waterkeeper, I consider local public engagement to be key to restoring the health of the Great Bay estuary, and it’s a major part of my work. But even for those already aware of the value of our local waters and the challenges of achieving clean water, getting engaged often is not easy. People…

Blog
Portsmouth to Proceed with Long-Awaited, New Sewage Treatment Plant
by Jeff Barnum

The Portsmouth, New Hampshire, City Council recently reaffirmed its commitment to build a new sewage treatment plant at the site of the present antiquated facility on Peirce Island. Completion of the long-awaited upgrade may still be a few years away, though it could have happened sooner if the City had elected to shift its plans…

Blog
Waterkeeper Vessel Launched for 2015!
by Jeff Barnum

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Waterkeeper vessel is back on the water for its second season. Interest is keen from folks who want to climb aboard and explore Great Bay and the Piscataqua River and other waters up close, and to discuss the challenges facing the estuary and the solutions for securing its health.

Conservation Matters Articles
Clean Solutions for Dirty Water
by Laurie O'Reilly

Our most iconic waterscapes – Cape Cod, Great Bay, Lake Champlain, and Narragansett Bay – are slowly being choked by nutrient pollution. Nutrient pollution is traced to fertilizer runoff from agriculture and lawns, animal waste from factory farms, and overflowing sewage. CLF is fighting against nutrient pollution and for clean water in New England.

Blog
A Healthy Approach to Lawn Care
by Jeff Barnum

Is the organic approach to lawn care and the movement against the use of chemical pesticides becoming mainstream? That seemed to be the case recently when more than 100 folks attended two events – one in York, Maine, and the second next door in Ogunquit – hosted by Scott Eldredge, owner of Eldredge Lumber and Hardware. Jay Feldman, director of…

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In Exeter, Another Vote for Clean Water
by Jeff Barnum

By a wide margin, the citizens of Exeter, New Hampshire, recently rejected a move to reduce the size of wetland buffers in their community. As I discussed in a recent blog, buffers are an important tool for protecting both the health of our wetlands and water quality. Considering the significant challenges facing our Great Bay…

Blog
Rainbow Smelt Declining in Great Bay
by Jeff Barnum

Are we losing yet another piece of our Great Bay ecosystem? After two winter seasons of declines in rainbow smelt, most recreational fishermen would likely say “yes.” The smelt run seems to be going the way of the Great Bay oyster – downward. Every winter, ice fishermen haul their shacks onto the rivers feeding Great Bay to await the return…

Blog
Protecting Wetlands, Protecting Water Quality in Exeter
by Jeff Barnum

Voters in Exeter, New Hampshire, have a choice to make on March 10. Article 8 of the town warrant proposes to roll back existing wetland buffer protections. If approved, the new ordinance would allow for development in areas where it has not been permitted previously. Wetlands are essential to clean water. They help filter pollutants…