Zero Waste

Blog
Can You Slash Your Trash for One Week?
by Olivia Synoracki

We live surrounded by trash, especially single-use plastic. It’s in our homes, schools, restaurants, offices, communities, and the environment. There’s so much waste that it can be easy to miss its full scale in our lives. Manufacturers and brand owners have created this throw-away culture by mass-producing disposable goods. But when it comes time to…

Blog
Vermont Takes Next Steps in Stopping Toxic Plastic Pollution
by Jen Duggan

We use dangerous plastics for just minutes – plastics that poison us, plastics that trash our waters and wildlife, and plastics that throw fuel on the climate crisis fire. It’s time to tell the plastics industry enough is enough and kick our plastic habit for good. The only way to solve this problem is to eliminate the use of single-use plastic products and hold corporations accountable for the public health and environmental impacts of their toxic plastic trash.

News Clips
Another View: Portsmouth has chance to lead on plastics, environment

What do Styrofoam cups and containers, plastic grocery bags, paper coffee cups, most plastic food ware and straws have in common? None are recyclable, and they are costing the city of Portsmouth a lot of money. Furthermore, lots of them end up on our beaches and shores as ugly reminders of our throw-away lifestyle.

Blog
Is Toxic Landfill Wastewater Coming to a Stream or Farm Near You?
by Elena Mihaly

The owners of the Coventry landfill are champing at the bit to supersize Vermont’s only active disposal site. But state regulators are holding out on approving one last permit needed for the expansion. This is because Casella has not yet addressed how it will safely dispose of one of the landfill’s most toxin-laden byproducts: leachate.…

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Disappointing Decisions Mark Rhode Island Legislative Session
by Amy Moses

This session, the Rhode Island General Assembly missed opportunities to make progress on a wide range of environmental issues. CLF and other environmental organizations pushed for action on the climate crisis, toxic chemicals, and plastics pollution, but no substantial new laws were enacted. It was not a total loss, however, as we were successful in preventing passage of some harmful measures.

Blog
The Truth about Plastic Bag Bans
by John Hite

Several studies have emerged challenging the effectiveness of plastic bag bans. These studies and their coverage in the media are causing some confusion among consumers and legislators. We want to set the record straight, as studies critiquing plastic bag bans don’t account for the broader scope of plastics.

News Clips
Boston Unveils New Composting Plan

“The best way to handle this is not to build landfill gas-to-energy systems or to capture the methane, because you’re never going to capture all of it,” Pecci said. “The best way to handle this is to keep our food scraps, our yard waste, our textiles, our paper and cardboard out of the landfill entirely.”

News Clips
Vermont adopts the most comprehensive plastics ban in U.S.

Jen Duggan, director of the Vermont Conservation Law Foundation, says cities and counties that have passed bag bans often defined prohibited bags by their thickness or applied measurements requiring that it carry a certain weight a certain distance. “What happened was the bag makers flooded the markets with thicker bags,” she says.