Zero Waste

Blog
Disappointing Decisions Mark Rhode Island Legislative Session
by Amy Moses

This session, the Rhode Island General Assembly missed opportunities to make progress on a wide range of environmental issues. CLF and other environmental organizations pushed for action on the climate crisis, toxic chemicals, and plastics pollution, but no substantial new laws were enacted. It was not a total loss, however, as we were successful in preventing passage of some harmful measures.

Blog
The Truth about Plastic Bag Bans
by John Hite

Several studies have emerged challenging the effectiveness of plastic bag bans. These studies and their coverage in the media are causing some confusion among consumers and legislators. We want to set the record straight, as studies critiquing plastic bag bans don’t account for the broader scope of plastics.

News Clips
Boston Unveils New Composting Plan

“The best way to handle this is not to build landfill gas-to-energy systems or to capture the methane, because you’re never going to capture all of it,” Pecci said. “The best way to handle this is to keep our food scraps, our yard waste, our textiles, our paper and cardboard out of the landfill entirely.”

News Clips
Vermont adopts the most comprehensive plastics ban in U.S.

Jen Duggan, director of the Vermont Conservation Law Foundation, says cities and counties that have passed bag bans often defined prohibited bags by their thickness or applied measurements requiring that it carry a certain weight a certain distance. “What happened was the bag makers flooded the markets with thicker bags,” she says.

Press Releases
Maine Bans Single-Use Plastic Bags

“Plastic bags are used for mere minutes before they poison our communities and our bodies for years,” said Kirstie Pecci, Director of the Zero Waste Project at CLF. “We cannot recycle our way out of this. Banning single-use plastics is the only way to protect our health and environment from this dangerous blight on our communities.”

Blog
The Connecticut Bottle Bill Needs Our Help
by Kirstie Pecci

Connecticut lawmakers are debating a bill right now that would help keep millions of bottles and cans out of Connecticut’s parks, beaches, and streets every year – at no cost to taxpayers. But the bill won’t pass if the plastics industry and big beverage brands get their way.