Transportation

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Maine Charges Forward to Develop Electric Vehicle Infrastructure
by Ben Tettlebaum

This week, Maine Governor Paul LePage and Québec Premier Philippe Couillard announced an exciting public-private partnership to expand electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure between Portland and Québec City. It’s no secret that CLF and the LePage Administration have had a charged relationship over many environmental issues, but this week’s announcement shows that finding common ground…

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Charging Up: CLF and Partners Release Electric Vehicle Report for Northeast/Mid-Atlantic Region
by Jenny Rushlow

Today, with partners Sierra Club and Acadia Center, CLF released a groundbreaking new report, Charging Up: The Role of States, Utilities, and the Auto Industry in Dramatically Accelerating Electric Vehicle Adoption in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic States. The report can be downloaded here. The new report outlines the policy pathway states in the Northeast and…

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Guest Blog: Fuel Tracking Makes Sense for Massachusetts
by Jenny Rushlow

Conservation Law Foundation has been working closely with the Union of Concerned Scientists and other partners to advance legislation that would implement transportation fuel tracking in Massachusetts. What is fuel tracking and why is it important? David Babson, senior engineer for Union of Concerned Scientists’ Clean Vehicles Program explains: I have been traveling to Massachusetts…

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In Rhode Island, the Answer is Yes on Bond Issue #6
by Jerry Elmer

On election day, Rhode Islanders will have an opportunity to address climate change by voting in favor of Transportation Bond Issue #6. The “Transit Infrastructure Bond Referendum,” will help provide much-needed funding for enhancements and renovations to mass transit infrastructure throughout Rhode Island. This, in turn, will improve the public’s mobility and access to jobs,…

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Calling Governor Patrick: Hold the Line Against Dirty Fuels in Massachusetts!
by Jenny Rushlow

Today 15 environmental organizations, including CLF, submitted this letter to Governor Deval Patrick. The letter calls on Governor Patrick to step up and take action against the anticipated entry of high-carbon tar sands–derived fuels into the Commonwealth’s fuel supply. Massachusetts has taken some important steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions – leadership in the Regional…

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Stopping State Handouts for Sprawl
by Sandy Levine

Over the past year it has been troubling to see large new development projects planned for areas around Vermont’s highway interchanges. It was not that long ago that Vermont’s then Governor Howard Dean issued an executive order protecting our highway interchanges from sprawl development. Our public dollars created the interstates and we have a responsibility…

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Transportation Matters for Maine
by Malcolm Burson

Let’s face it, Maine is a big rural state (larger than the five remaining New England states taken together), where lowering greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles has been and will be a continuing challenge. CLF’s Maine office is actively engaged in three different projects with a wide range of partners who are determined to find…

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Massachusetts Leading the Way on Electric Vehicle Transit
by Christine Chilingerian

The Worcester Regional Transit Authority (WRTA) is about to make Massachusetts a national leader in electric vehicle, or “EV”, transit. The WRTA has just purchased three additional electric buses, which will join the existing bus fleet of 46. This includes ten hybrid buses (diesel-electric) as well as three existing electric buses. With a grand total…

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Getting Around — WITHOUT the Circ Highway
by Sandy Levine

After decades of fighting the Circ Highway – an outdated massive highway ring-road once planned around Burlington Vermont – CLF is now part of the unanimous support for the final round of projects that will replace the Circ. The very good news is that the 34 projects being advanced will improve existing roadways and intersections,…

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Driving Climate Change
by Sandy Levine

A version of this article appeared in the November 17, 2013 edition  of the Sunday Rutland Herald / Times Argus. The biggest contribution to climate change in Vermont comes from how we get ourselves around. As a rural state we rely on cars — and they burn a lot of gasoline, producing significant greenhouse gas…