New Hampshire

Press Releases
Environmental Groups File Lawsuit Against Casella Waste Systems, Inc.

“Casella must finally be held responsible for its illegal discharges of pollutants into the Ammonoosuc River,” said Tom Irwin, Director of Conservation Law Foundation New Hampshire. “Unfortunately, this pollution is another sign that landfills are dangerous and not a sustainable solution to our waste problems. It’s time to stop expanding toxic landfills and start protecting communities by reducing waste at its source through recycling and other efforts.”

Blog
Climate Change Preparedness on Trial
by Elena Mihaly

Harvey. Irma. Maria. Nate. Last year, during a 45-day period, eight consecutive named storms strengthened into hurricanes. All told, the 2017 hurricane season was the most expensive in history, causing more than $200 billion in damage nationwide. Meanwhile, so-called 100-year floods are becoming so common the metric is losing its meaning and utility. For instance,…

Blog
Nitrogen Denial in the Great Bay Estuary
by Melissa Paly

The Great Bay-Piscataqua Estuary is an incredible place. It’s home to numerous fish and bird species and provides spectacular fishing, boating, and recreation for the people of New Hampshire, Maine, and beyond. But persistent high levels of nitrogen pollution have disrupted these waters, and while progress is being made, some municipal officials are fighting against the changes that can save Great Bay.

Press Releases
CLF Continues Fight Against Northern Pass

“Eversource continues to go through the procedural steps necessary to keep the Northern Pass project on life support, but the project is largely dead,” said Melissa Birchard, CLF staff attorney.

Blog
Fisheries Managers Fail to Protect Our Ocean (Again)
by Peter Shelley

After 14 years of development, a newly approved plan for managing New England’s fisheries should have prioritized protection of important ocean habitats and improved the long-term well-being of our fishing economy. Instead, in a short-sighted decision, fishery managers put fragile habitats and overfished species at even greater risk than they are today.