Settlement on Large Transmission Project Adds Benefits for Communities, Environment, and Climate

Sandy Levine | @CLFLevine

Conservation Law Foundation recently reached a settlement in a Vermont permitting case for a large new electric transmission project proposed by TDI-NE.

The settlement adds significant benefits to a project planned to bring additional power from Canada into New England. The settlement ensures that the power being transmitted comes from hydro, wind, and solar projects – a critical step in meeting regional goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The settlement also boosts efforts to clean up Lake Champlain, which CLF has long championed, with TDI-NE committing more than $200 million towards cleaning up the lake, and $70 million for Vermont renewable energy.

You can read the Agreement here. And here is the TDI announcement about the Agreement.

The proposed project will deliver up to 1000 MW of power from Canadian sources to customers in Southern New England. That’s about equal to the power generated from one very large coal-fired plant, but with lower greenhouse gas emissions. The power would be sourced from large-scale hydro, wind and solar, all of which are considered renewable under Vermont law.

Building this transmission line is a significant project, one that will run entirely underwater, including under Lake Champlain, or underground and travel much of the length of Vermont. The agreement strengthens the environmental and public benefits of the project, including adding an additional $121 million over the life of the project to support Vermont renewable energy and much-needed Lake Champlain clean-up.

Highlights from the agreement include:

  • Increasing the combined monetary value of the Lake Champlain Phosphorous Cleanup Fund, Lake Champlain Enhancement and Restoration Trust Fund, and Vermont Renewables Programs Fund from the originally proposed $162 million to a minimum of $283.5 million over the 40-year life of the project.
  • Establishing a Renewables Integration Advisory Committee, which includes CLF and will seek to optimize and maximize the use of the project for improved integration of renewable power in New England.
  • Appointment of CLF to the Advisory Board of the Lake Champlain Enhancement and Restoration Trust Fund, which will make determinations about funding projects to enhance Lake Champlain.
  • Submission to regulators and the public by TDI-NE of all contracts with energy suppliers who utilize the transmission line to confirm that the energy shipped on the line is generated from non-fossil fuel energy sources.

With these agreements from TDI, CLF has agreed not to oppose any project-specific permits. But we do retain our right to express our views about electric transmission generally, funding processes for transmission projects, and the sources of power that will be transmitted by the proposed project.

CLF is pleased to have been able to work constructively with TDI-NE to reach this agreement, which demonstrates a good path forward in meeting our region’s future power and climate change needs while also promoting the general good of Vermont communities today. With several other transmission projects currently under consideration across New England, CLF will continue our critical role of watchdog to assure that our communities, environment, and climate are protected and our future power supply is clean and reliable.

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